Holes

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Saddleback Educational Publ, Aug 1, 2006 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 42 pages
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Struggling readers frequently lack basic reading skills and are not equipped with the prior knowledge and reading strategies to thoroughly engage in the classroom literature experience. Give your students the background and support they need to understand and enjoy literature. With these reading guides, your students will practice reading comprehension skills, sharpen their vocabulary, and learn to identify literary elements. Paperback books range in reading level from 4 to 10. Reproducible. Contents Include: Teacher and student support materials, reproducible student activity sheets, an end-of-book test, and an answer key. Each reading guide divides the novel into six manageable units. Prepares all students for reading success through activating prior knowledge. Focuses reading with guiding "Questions to Think About". Build vocabulary with pre-reading and during-reading activities.
 

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Contents

Focus Your Reading
2
Build Your Vocabulary
4
Multiple Choice
5
Short Answer
6
Deepen Your Understanding
7
Focus Your Reading
8
Build Your Vocabulary
10
Multiple Choice
11
Multiple Choice
23
Short Answer
24
Deepen Your Understanding
25
Focus Your Reading
26
Build Your Vocabulary
28
Multiple Choice
29
Short Answer
30
Deepen Your Understanding
31

Short Answer
12
Deepen Your Understanding
13
Focus Your Reading
14
Build Your Vocabulary
16
Multiple Choice
17
Short Answer
18
Deepen Your Understanding
19
Focus Your Reading
20
Build Your Vocabulary
22
Focus Your Reading
32
Build Your Vocabulary
34
Multiple Choice
35
Short Answer
36
Deepen Your Understanding
37
EndofBook Test
38
Answer Key
40
Copyright

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Page 39 - Reading, or they may refine the definitions based on the context of the sentence and the reading overall. Students' new sentences will vary. Check Your Understanding: Multiple Choice 1. b 2. a 3. c 4. b 5. a 6. a 7. c 8. b 9. a 10.
Page 15 - Zigzag's shovel had hit him." throbbing: 2. "Zero stared at him with penetrating eyes." penetrating: 3. "As he tried to cover them up, he unearthed a corner of the sack." unearthed: 4. "His body writhed in agony." writhed: 5. "Stanley wondered if this was how a condemned man felt on his way to the electric chair. . . ." condemned: 6. "Walking across the desolate wasteland, Stanley thought about his great-grandfather. . . ." desolate: 7. "He suddenly realized where he'd seen the gold tube before....
Page 15 - Walking across the desolate wasteland, Stanley thought about his great-grandfather...." desolate: 7. "He suddenly realized where he'd seen the gold tube before.... He felt a jolt of astonishment." astonishment: 8. "A special prize was given every year to Miss Katherine Barlow for her fabulous spiced peaches.
Page 3 - ... home' sanitary." sanitary: 7. "Because of the scarcity of water, each camper was only allowed a four-minute shower." scarcity: 8. "It was too much of a coincidence to be a mere accident." coincidence: 9. "The judge called Stanley's crime despicable.
Page v - Between those dates, slaves continued to work as they always had. When Texas slaves were officially freed, the celebration known as Juneteenth was born. Black Codes were laws passed by some Southern state legislatures after the Civil War. In Texas, Black Codes were enacted in 1866. These laws defined blacks' legal standing, continuing the inferior status that they had had before the Civil War.
Page 6 - Deepen Your Understanding In writing, a flashback is an interruption of events telling things that happened in the past. In Holes, there are numerous flashbacks that tell something about Stanley's father or ancestors. What do you think of this device? Do you think it makes Stanley's story more interesting? Is it confusing? Explain your ideas about flashbacks in this novel. Focus ON READING: HOLES DATE II.
Page 18 - Deepen Your Understanding Imagine that you, like Zero, have only recently learned to read and write. Write a letter to a family member or a friend explaining what reading and writing mean to you. Explain how you used to get along without these skills, and how your life has changed now that you have them.