Holism and Complementary Medicine: Origins and principles

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Allen & Unwin, Apr 1, 2006 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 240 pages
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The return to holistic therapies is one of the most important developments in health over the past two decades. With preventative medicine being taken more seriously by conventional health practitioners, and the increasing popularity of natural and complementary therapies among consumers, it is clear that a holistic approach will be integral to health care in the future.

Holism and Complementary Medicine offers a systematic overview of traditional healing practices, the development of the Western biomedical model from the ancient Egyptians and Greeks to the present, and the holistic philosophy which is the basis of complementary and alternative medicine in the West. The book explores the differences between holistic and conventional biomedical traditions and approaches, acknowledging the strengths of each. It also addresses key practice issues, examining the role holistic principles have to play in today's health system and explaining their place in the therapeutic relationship.

Holism and Complementary Medicine is an accessible guide for students, practitioners and anyone interested in the origins and core principles of natural therapies.

'This scholarly exploration of the conceptual evolution of holistic medicine is a fascinating read. Di Stefano is to be congratulated for his articulate insights into healing relationships and how our health paradigms enhance or inhibit our understanding of health and disease.' - Joseph Pizzorno, ND, President Emeritus, Bastyr University

'This is a magnificent read for students of natural and complementary medicine, as well as health professionals and lay public who have often wondered where the movement towards holism in medicine began and is headed.' - Paul Orrock, Head of the School of Natural and Complementary Medicine, Southern Cross University

'. . . brings together many threads that link the health of body, mind and society, drawing richly from a larger corpus of intellectual inquiry into history, philosophy, and human endeavor, including clinical medicine.' - Bruce Barrett MD PhD, Assistant Professor of Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison
 

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Contents

Part II Principles
57
Glossary
174
References
178
Notes
187
Index
199
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Page 10 - The art of medicine is thus divided amongst them : each physician applies himself to one disease only, and not more. All places abound in physicians ; some physicians are for the eyes, others for the head, others for the teeth, others for the parts about the belly, and others for internal disorders.
Page 36 - Medicine's position today is akin to that of state religions yesterday—it has an officially approved monopoly of the right to define health and illness and to treat illness.
Page 124 - The transition from a paradigm in crisis to a new one from which a new tradition of normal science can emerge is far from a cumulative process, one achieved by an articulation or extension of the old paradigm.
Page 134 - ... that cannot, despite repeated effort, be aligned with professional expectation. In these and other ways besides, normal science repeatedly goes astray. And when it does when, that is, the profession can no longer evade anomalies that subvert the existing tradition of scientific practice - then begin the extraordinary investigations that lead the profession at last to a new set of commitments, a new basis for the practice of science.
Page 63 - ... movements of the appetites and passions; and finally the movements of all the external members. ... I desire, I say, that you consider that these functions occur naturally in this machine solely by the disposition of its organs, not less than the movements of a clock or other automaton.
Page 124 - During the transition period there will be a large but never complete overlap between the problems that can be solved by the old and the new paradigm. But there will also be a decisive difference in the modes of solution. When the transition is complete, the profession will have changed its view of the field, its methods, and its goals.
Page 56 - ... similar wonders. The great world is only a product of the imagination of the universal mind, and man is a little world of its own that imagines and creates by the power of imagination. If man's imagination is strong enough to penetrate into every corner of his interior world, it will be able to create things in those corners, and whatever man thinks will take form in his soul.
Page 152 - The preparadigm period, in particular, is regularly marked by frequent and deep debates over legitimate methods, problems and standards of solution...

About the author (2006)

Vincent Di Stefano is a practitioner in osteopathy and western herbal medicine, with a practice in Melbourne. He has qualifications in gerontology, acupuncture and naturopathy as well as a Masters in health sciences. He has lectured extensively and private colleges and is currently lecturing at Victoria University. He regularly contributes to a number of journals, conferences and professional associations.

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