Holistic Health and Biomedical Medicine: A Countersystem Analysis

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SUNY Press, Aug 14, 1990 - Medical - 268 pages
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Holistic Health and Biomedical Medicine outlines a new framework for social science research. Illustrated in an analysis of the American health care system, Lyng presents an empirical study of the relationship between medical knowledge and the social structure of medical practice in America. Through a synthesis of ideas from such diverse perspectives as classical Marxian theory and the medical model embraced by the holistic health movement, Lyng articulates a “medical countersystem” that is contrasted against the traditional biomedical model of medical practice. What results is an entirely unique Marxian analysis of the U.S. health care system, one that examines how the system evolved historically as well as describes several possibilities for the future of medicine in America.
 

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Contents

The Dialectical Paradigm
9
THE PHILOSOPHY OF INTERNAL RELATIONS
14
The Core Elements of the Philosophy of Internal Relations
15
The Dialectical Theory of SocietyTwo Approaches
23
THE SCIENTIFIC DIALECTICAL PERSPECTIVE
24
THE PRAXIS DIALECTICAL PERSPECTIVE
28
Fundamental Relations of the Social Crystal
37
RELATIONS BETWEEN ELEMENTS OF THE SOCIAL SYSTEM
40
Response to Disease
113
Treatment of Disease
115
The Structural Relations of Health Production
119
THE HEALTH PRODUCTION PROCESS
120
INTEREST GROUP STRUCTURE AND THE TRADITIONAL MEDICAL MODEL
130
Medical Practitioners
131
The Owners of the Industrial Means of Production
135
The Bureaucratic Imperative
140

RELATIONS BETWEEN KNOWLEDGE AND SOCIAL STRUCTURE
42
Introduction to Part II
47
The Medical Model of the Future The Holistic Health CountersystemUtopia
55
KNOWLEDGE CONTENT
64
The Role of Subjective Consciousness in Health Production
77
The Source of Organic Disfunction
81
Symptoms and Organic Disfunction
86
Diagnosis of Organic Disfunction
87
Treatment of Organic Disfunction
89
Normative Elements
92
THE DISTRIBUTION OF MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE
93
THE SOCIAL STRUCTURAL DIMENSION
95
The Structure of Medical Practice
96
CONCLUSIONS
98
The Traditional Medical Model
99
THE MEDICAL SCIENTIFIC PARADIGM
100
The Definition of Health
101
The Role of Subjective Consciousness in Health Production
102
The Nature of Organic Disfunction
104
Diagnosis of Disease
112
INTERRELATIONS BETWEEN INTERESTS GROUPS
146
THE PRINCIPLE OF ORGANIZATION
158
Diachronic Analysis of Medical Practice
163
THE EVOLUTION OF HEALTH STATUS
164
THE EVOLUTION OF MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE
173
Domestic Medicine
174
The Transition to Heroic Medicine
175
Thomsonian Medicine
179
The Challenge of Homeopathic Medicine
185
The Rise of the Medical Scientific Model
193
A New Form of Holism
196
THE HISTORICAL EVOLUTION OF MEDICAL PRACTICE
203
Emerging Trends Back to the Future
221
WHO WILL CONTROL THE HEALTH CARE SYSTEM OF THE FUTURE?
231
Epilogue
241
Notes
247
References
255
Index
265
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About the author (1990)

Stephen Lyng is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Virginia Commonwealth University.

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