Holy Brotherhood: Romani Music in a Hungarian Pentecostal Church

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Oxford University Press, Dec 12, 2002 - Music - 224 pages
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Holy Brotherhood: Romani Music in a Hungarian Pentecostal Church is a musical ethnography of a religious community. After the end of socialism, different ethnic groups in Hungary harbored antagonism toward one another. In one Pentecostal church in Pecs, Hungary, however, both Hungarians and Roma (Gypsies) worshipped and made music together. Three musical repertoires coexisted, each with a separate historical background and complex social meanings: Romani religious song; nineteenth-century gospel hymns originally from the United States; and contemporary Christian pop from the United States. Church members accommodated cultural and musical differences by developing several distinct performance styles.
 

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Contents

V
21
VI
47
VII
69
VIII
84
IX
107
X
131
XI
149
XII
165
XIII
173
XIV
175
XV
179
XVI
187
XVII
199
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Page 21 - Pentecostalism when the Soviet army occupied Hungary at the end of World War II.
Page 7 - Africa, Southeast Asia, and other parts of the world, as well as Eastern Europe (Hollenweger 1972).
Page 7 - Pentecostalism began in the United States at the turn of the twentieth century...

About the author (2002)

Barbara Rose Lange is Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at Moores School of Music, University of Houston

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