Holy Land: A Suburban Memoir

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W. W. Norton & Company, Apr 17, 2005 - Biography & Autobiography - 194 pages
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"Infinitely moving and powerful, just dead-on right, and absolutely original."—Joan Didion

Since its publication in 1996, Holy Land has become an American classic. In "quick, translucent prose" (Michiko Kakutani, New York Times) that is at once lyrical and unsentimental, D. J. Waldie recounts growing up in Lakewood, California, a prototypical post-World War II suburb. Laid out in 316 sections as carefully measured as a grid of tract houses, Holy Land is by turns touching, eerie, funny, and encyclopedic in its handling of what was gained and lost when thousands of blue-collar families were thrown together in the suburbs of the 1950s. An intensely realized and wholly original memoir about the way in which a place can shape a life, Holy Land; is ultimately about the resonance of choices—how wide a street should be, what to name a park—and the hopes that are realized in the habits of everyday life. 20 illustrations and a new introduction for this paperback edition.

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"The Mind of Christ: The Transforming Power of Thinking His Thoughts" by T.W. Hunt served to be an insightful and exhilarating read for those searching to have "the mind of christ." In my opinion ... Read full review

Holy land: a suburban memoir

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Both these books focus on how the concept of home shaped the lives of 1950s American families. Froncek tells a poignant story of a son's attempt to reconcile himself to his father, an event triggered ... Read full review

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About the author (2005)

D. J. Waldie still lives in the tract house he writes about. He has received a Whiting Writers Award and a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, among other honors.

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