Home Economics: A Guide to Household Management

Front Cover
Century Company, 1906 - Home economics - 416 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 194 - ... should be kept in mind, and the well-exercised muscles of the mature animal should be used for this purpose. Nearly all the immature animals are in market through the spring and summer, and to some extent in the fall; but there is little of this kind of meat to be found on sale in the winter. Rigor Mortis.— After the death of an animal the muscles become rigid. Sometimes this occurs very quickly, and, again, it may be hours before this state is developed. This stiffening of the muscles is supposed...
Page 148 - DON'TS 1. Don't stir a hard-coal fire on the top. 2. Don't pack the coal. 3. Don't let the coal come to the top of the lining of the fire-box. 4. Don't let the ashes remain in the ash-pan to absorb the heat. TO REMOVE CLINKERS When clinkers adhere to the lining of the fire-box, they may be easily removed. Put a thick bed of oyster- or clamshells on the red-hot fire. The heat converts the shells into quicklime, which loosens the clinkers. If the shells are not to be had, put a few pounds of quicklime...
Page 149 - ... to do nothing at table which could give offense to the most fastidious. It is the duty of every one to do his or her part to make the time passed at table as bright and full of cheer as possible. The worry, haste, lack of conversation, and often the ill temper shown at table have much to do with the national disease known as dyspepsia. The dining-room should be well lighted and well ventilated. The chairs should be comfortable, with backs that are almost straight, and they should be absolutely...
Page 58 - Fortunately, in most buildings there is one source of supply of pure air which is independent of the architect's plans. This is the diffusion of gases through the porous materials of which the buildings are constructed. There is also a good deal of ventilation through the cracks and other apertures which are always to be found in our buildings. Under some conditions which are not thoroughly understood the air becomes badly contaminated by the decomposition of animal and vegetable matter. Air thus...
Page 46 - All springs should be covered for the protection of the sheets and blankets. 1. Have mattress turned in different direction each day. 2. Spread under sheet smoothly over mattress, tucking it under the mattress. remember. 3. Spread top sheet so as to tuck in well at foot. 4. Blankets with free ends at the head. 5. Fold sheet over blankets, then turn both back in a fold. Tuck in at sides of the bed, not under the mattress. 6. Put on spread and pillows. • THE KITCHEN So much of the health and comfort...
Page 33 - ... the residue, then on heating these parts of the residue we shall probably see them darken, fuse, and burn away in part, giving out fumes having a disagreeable smell. If the blackening is considerable, much organic matter is present; but if the smell is offensive (like burnt feathers), then it is certain that the organic matter is of animal origin, and is, therefore, more likely to be unwholesome, or even poisonous.
Page 161 - Upon little be nanded with the beverage, so that each one may matters add more, if he desires. These little matters are erfection necessary, because upon them depends the perfection of his cup of tea or coffee, a consideration by no means unimportant to the habitual tea- or coffeedrinker. The spoon should never be left in the cup. The knife and fork should be placed straight on the plate after using, and side by side. Toothpicks, like tooth-brushes, should be used only in the privacy leaveknife,...
Page 62 - Make the fires, and air the dining-room and «££ hall, keeper. 2. Prepare the breakfast and set the table. 3. Put the bedrooms to air while the family is at breakfast. 4. Remove the breakfast-dishes; put away the food. Sort the dishes and put to soak all dishes and utensils that have had food in them which would be likely to stick. 5. Put dining-room and sitting-room in order, airing them well. 6. Wash the dishes, and put the kitchen and pantries in order. Prepare dishes that require slow cooking,...
Page 47 - With the exception of some localities far back in cookiB°r tne county where it is still used, wood as a fuel purposes, for cooking has not been employed for many years. Anthracite coal takes its place in some parts of the country, and bituminous coal in others. For the last twenty years gas as a fuel for cooking purposes has been growing in favor. Various forms of petroleum are also used. Electricity is now preparing to enter the field as a powerful rival of all the other fuels. The costliness of...
Page 149 - ... elaborate households,— there should always be a always be care to make the table and food pleasing to the tractive, eye. Well-laundered table-linen, tableware that has been properly washed and wiped and that is arranged in an orderly manner, are the strongest factors in making a table elegant and attractive. A few flowers loosely arranged, a bunch of ferns, or a small plant or fern will adorn and brighten a table more than any other one thing that can be used. Such decorations are in place...

Bibliographic information