Home to Work: Motherhood and the Politics of Industrial Homework in the United States

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Cambridge University Press, May 27, 1994 - History - 383 pages
In the minds of most people, the home has stood apart from the world of work. Bringing the factory or office into the home challenges this division. From the 1870s, when New York cigarmakers attempted to end tenement competition, to New Deal prohibitions in the 1930s, gender ideologies shaped the battle over homework. But by the 1980s, the middle-class mother at the keyboard replaced the victimized immigrant as the symbol of homework. Home to Work restores the voices of homeworking women to the century-long debate over their labor. The book also provides a historical context to the Reaganite lifting of New Deal bans. Where once men's right to contract precluded regulation, now women's right to employment undermined prohibition. Whether empowerment comes from rights to homework or rights as workers depends on whether homeworkers become visible as workers who happen to mother.
 

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Contents

A mans dwelling house is his castle Tenement house cigarmaking and the judicial imperative
21
White slaves of the cities Campaigns against sweated clothing
49
Women who work and women who spend The family economy vs the family wage
81
Visions and voices
123
Soldiers of freedom garments of slavery Patriotic homework
125
To study their own conditions States rights to regulate
151
Homework is a community question The worlds of the homeworker
171
Engendering the New Deal
199
Strike while the iron is hot The politics of enactment the perils of enforcement
245
Unknown to the common law The Fair Labor Standards Act
273
Home work redux
303
With a keyboard in one hand White collars in the home
305
Deregulating the rights of women
337
Index of cases
367
Index
369
Copyright

To improve on business through law Homework under the National Recovery Administration
201

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