Homeland Security Preparedness and Information Systems: Strategies for Managing Public Policy: Strategies for Managing Public Policy

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Reddick, Christopher G.
IGI Global, Sep 30, 2009 - Computers - 274 pages
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Homeland security information systems are an important area of inquiry due to the tremendous influence information systems play on the preparation and response of government to a terrorist attack or natural disaster.

Homeland Security Preparedness and Information Systems: Strategies for Managing Public Policy delves into the issues and challenges that public managers face in the adoption and implementation of information systems for homeland security. A defining collection of field advancements, this publication provides solutions for those interested in adopting additional information systems security measures in their governments.

 

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Contents

CitizenCentric EGovernment
46
Collaboration andEGovernment
77
Federal Government HomelandSecurity Information Systems
93
Information Technology andEmergency Management
112
Local Government HomelandSecurity Information Systems
136
Citizens the Internet andTerrorism Information
152
Information Securityin Government
166
Emergency ManagementWebsites
187
Conclusion
204
Survey Evidence from InformationTechnology Directors
213
A Study of Federal Government CIOs
230
about the author
251
Index
252
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Christopher G. Reddick is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Public Administration at the University of Texas at San Antonio, USA. Dr. Reddick’s research and teaching interests is in e-government. Some of his publications can be found in Government Information Quarterly, Electronic Government, and the International Journal of Electronic Government Research. Dr. Reddick recently edited the book entitled Handbook of Research on Strategies for Local E-Government Adoption and Implementation: Comparative Studies. [Editor]

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