Homer: The Iliad

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A&C Black, Dec 20, 2012 - Literary Criticism - 128 pages
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This book offers a clear and stimulating introduction to Homer's Iliad, the greatest poem of Western culture. It discusses central aspects of the work (including the tradition of oral poetry, the style and structure of the epic, and its depiction of the gods, heroism, war, and gender roles) and guides the reader in understanding the skill and profundity of Homer's achievement. This introduction is ideal for undergraduates and students in the upper forms of schools, but it requires no knowledge of ancient Greek and is intended for all readers interested in Homer.

The Classical World series is well established and explores the culture and achievements of the civilizations of Greece and Rome. Concise yet informative and stimulating, each book includes illustrations and suggestions for further reading and study. Designed specifically for students and teachers of Classical Civilization at late school and early university level, the series provides an up-to-date collection of accessible guides to the history, institutions, literature, art and values of the Classical world.
 

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Contents

Preface
7
Map
8
1 Homer and Early Greek Epic
11
2 Language Style and Structure
23
3 The Hero and Homeric Society
35
4 Mortals and Immortals
49
5 War and Family Life
61
Epilogue
71
Suggestions for Further Reading
73
Index
77
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

William Allan is the McConnell Laing Fellow and Tutor in Greek and Latin Languages and Literature at University College, Oxford, and Lecturer at the Faculty of Classics, University of Oxford, UK. He is the author of Euripides' Medea (also published by Bloomsbury).

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