Homicide and Gun Control: The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act and Homicide Rates

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LFB Scholarly Pub., 2008 - Law - 213 pages
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Monroe investigates the success of the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act at reducing homicide. Using data from the 1989 - 1997 Uniform Crime Reports: Supplemental Homicide Reports, Monroe conducts differences-in-differences-in-differences (DDD) analyses. Monroe's results indicate that Brady had no effect on overall adult homicide rates and caused a statistically insignificant decline in adult handgun homicide rates. Contrary to an anticipated substitution effect - wherein the use of long guns in homicide would increase as handguns became more difficult to acquire -Brady's implementation is significantly related to a decrease in the use of rifles, shotguns and other non-handgun firearms to commit homicide.

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Contents

The Importance of Gun Control Research
5
An Empirical Test of the Brady Bill
31
Failing to Reduce Handgun Homicide Rates
79
Guiding Policy with Empirical Evidence
127
EndNotes
143
Treatment and Control States as Originally
149
Background Check Requirements for Cities
157
References
191
Index
211
Copyright

About the author (2008)

Jeffrey Monroe┐s work centers on criminal justice policy with particular focus on gun violence and gun control. He earned his Ph.D. in Criminal Justice from Temple University An Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice at Xavier University, Monroe has written and spoken internationally on gun control initiatives. He resides in Lebanon, OH with his wife Wendy and daughter Lucy.

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