Honor and Shame in the Gospel of Matthew

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Westminster John Knox Press, 1998 - Religion - 287 pages
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The pivotal values of the ancient world were honor and shame - the worth one had in the eyes of one's neighbor. Here, Jerome Neyrey clarifies what praise and blame meant to Matthew and his audience. He examines the traditional literary forms for bestowing honor and praise and the conventional grounds for awarding them in Matthew's world. Neyrey argues that the evangelist Matthew was trained in conventional ways, and that his writing employs many of the genres taught in the rhetorical handbooks concerning praise.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Honor and Shame in Cultural Perspective
14
Reading Matthew in Cultural Perspective
35
The Rhetoric of Praise and Blame
70
Origins Birth Nurture and Training
90
Accomplishments and Deeds
106
Deeds of the Body
127
A Noble Death
139
312Honoring the Dishonored
164
2148Calling Off the Honor Game
190
118Vacating the Playing Field
212
Bibliography
229
Index of Scripture and Other Ancient Sources
278
Index of Subjects and Ancient Authors
285
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Jerome H. Neyrey is Professor Emeritus of New Testament Studies at the University of Notre Dame in Notre Dame, Indiana and executive secretary of The Context Group in South Bend, Indiana.

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