Hope and Other Dangerous Pursuits

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2005 - Fiction - 188 pages
6 Reviews
In her exciting debut, Laila Lalami evokes the grit and enduring grace that is modern Morocco and offers an authentic look at the Muslim immigrant experience today. 



The book begins as four Moroccans illegally cross the Strait of Gibraltar in an inflatable boat headed for Spain. There’s Murad, a gentle, educated man who’s been reduced to hustling tourists around Tangier; Halima, who’s fleeing her drunken husband and the slums of Casablanca; Aziz, who must leave behind his devoted wife to find work in Spain; and Faten, a student and religious fanatic whose faith is at odds with an influential man determined to destroy her future.

 What has driven these men and women to risk their lives? And will the rewards prove to be worth the danger? Sensitively written with beauty and boldness, this is a grip ping book about people in search of a better future.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - akeela - LibraryThing

This young Moroccan-born writer has produced a wonderful debut collection of short stories, set in modern-day Morocco, and Spain. The first half of the book depicts various characters in Morocco who ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - debnance - LibraryThing

Though set in Morocco, not Mexico, and the body of water crossed is the Mediterranean, not the Rio Grande, the stories of the desperate immigrants told in this book are eerily similar to those of many new Texans. The writing is lovely and the stories are captivating. Read full review

Contents

THE TRIP I
4
THE FANATIC
19
BUS RIDES
52
ACCEPTANCE
74
BETTER LUCK TOMORROW
95
THE SAINT
113
THE ODALISQUE I 27
146
THE STORYTELLER
168
Acknowledgments
187
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About the author (2005)

LAILA LALAMI was born and raised in Morocco. Her work has appeared in the Baltimore Review, the Los Angeles Times, the Independent, the Nation, and elsewhere. She is the creator and editor of the literary blog www.moorishgirl.com. She lives in Portland, Oregon. 

 

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