Hopper

Front Cover
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Mar 25, 2009 - Art - 80 pages
Recent U.S. poet laureate Mark Strand examines the work of frequently misunderstood American painter Edward Hopper, whose enigmatic paintings--of gas stations, storefronts, cafeterias, and hotel rooms--number among the most powerful of our time. Featured in a series of upcoming museum lectures. Illustrations throughout.
 

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Contents

Preface
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
XVIII
XIX
XX
XXI
XXII
XXIII
XXIV
XXV

VIII
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X
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XII
XIII
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XVI
XVII
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XXIX
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XXXI
XXXII
Illustration Credits
A Note About the Author

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About the author (2009)

Mark Strand was born in Summerside, Prince Edward Island, Canada, and was raised and educated in the United States. He has written nine books of poems, which have brought him many honors and grants, including a MacArthur Fellowship and, for Blizzard of One, the 1999 Pulitzer Prize. he was chosen as Poet Laureate of the United States in 1990. He is the author of a book of stories, Mr. and Mrs. Baby, several volumes of translations (including works by Rafael Alberti and Carlos Drummond de Andrade, among others), the editor of a number of anthologies, and the author of two monographs on contempory artists. He teaches in the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago.


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