Horace Bushnell, the Citizen

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1900 - 18 pages
 

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Page 12 - There shall be sung another golden age, The rise of empire and of arts, The good and great inspiring epic rage, The wisest heads and noblest hearts...
Page 6 - Providence itself grows cold, and there, making warmth by their exercise and their prayers, they prepared a happier state of competence and wealth, than the Goshen of the sunny Nile ever saw. Your condition will hereafter be softened, and your comforts multiplied. Let your culture be as much advanced. But let no delicate spirit that despises work grow up in your sons and daughters. Make these rocky hills smooth their faces and smile under your industry. Let no absurd ambition tempt you to imitate...
Page 6 - True there was a rigor in their piety, a want of gentle feeling; their Christian graces were cast-iron shapes, answering with a hard metallic ring. But they stood the rough wear of life none the less durably for the excessive hardness of their temperament, kept their families and communities none the less truly, though it may be less benignly, under the sense of God and religion. If we find something to modify or soften, in their over-rigid notions of Christian living, it is yet something to know...
Page 7 - Here is a scene for the painter of some future day — I see it even now before me. In the distance and behind the huts of Hartford waves the signal flag by which the town watch is to give notice of enemies. In the foreground stands the tall, swart form of the soldier in his armor ; and before him, in sacred apostolic majesty, the manly Hooker. Haynes and Hopkins, with the Legislature and the hardy, toil-worn settlers and their wives and daughters, are gathered round them in close order, gazing with...
Page 9 - ... conditions, and so as to maintain the fixed rule of majorities, in all questions left for the decision of districts. The schools, in other words, shall be common, in just the same sense that all the laws are common, so that the experience of families and of children under them, shall be an experience of the great republican rule of majorities — an exercise for majorities, of obedience to fixed statutes, and of moderation and impartial respect to the rights and feelings of minorities — an...
Page 5 - County. Who they are, by name, we cannot tell: no matter who they are: we should be none the wiser if we could name them ; they themselves none the more honorable.
Page 7 - Recognized, of course, it is not ; but still it is felt. This, now, is the kind of power in which Connecticut is to have her name and greatness. This, in small, is what Connecticut should be. She is to find her first and noblest interest, apart from religion, in the full and perfect education of her sons and daughters.
Page 1 - The time came, long before I saw him, when the legal or forensic theories of the Atonement were not true for me; if I had not found his ' God in Christ,' and ' Christ in Theology,' I must have stopped preaching. Dr. Bushnell gave me a moral theology and helped me to believe in the justice of God. If I have had any gospel to preach, during the last thirty-five years, it is because he led me into the light and joy of it.
Page 2 - He did not deny a certain antithesis between nature and the supernatural, but he so defined the latter that the two could be embraced in the one category of nature when viewed as the ascertained order of God in creation. The supernatural is simply the realm of freedom, and it is as natural as the physical realm of necessity. Thus he not only got rid of the traditional antinomy between them, but led the way into that conception of the relation of God to his world which more and more is taking possession...
Page 12 - He saw twice as much as most people do out of 1 We regard this sentence as the most discriminating remark concerning Bushnell that we have ever seen. doors, took a mental survey of all land surfaces, and kept in his head a complete map of the physical geography of every place with which he was acquainted. He knew the leaf and bark of every tree and shrub that grows in New England ; estimated the water power of every stream he crossed ; knew where...

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