Houghton and the Walpoles

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Simpkin, Marshall and Company, 1865 - Dwellings - 43 pages
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Page 15 - I doated, and who doated on me ! There are the two rival mistresses of Houghton, neither of whom ever wished to enjoy it! There too lies he who founded its greatness, to contribute to whose fall Europe was embroiled; there he sleeps in quiet and dignity, while his friend and his foe, rather his false ally and real enemy, Newcastle and Bath, are exhausting the dregs of their pitiful lives in squabbles and pamphlets.
Page 15 - Houghton! and alone ! in this spot, where (except two hours last month) I have not been in sixteen years ! Think, what a crowd of reflections ! No ; Gray, and forty church-yards, could not furnish so many ; nay, I know one must feel them with greater indifference than I possess, to have patience to put them into verse. Here I am, probably for the last time...
Page 13 - ... wish — but this is all; the instant he leaves you, you, all the world are nothing to him — he would not give himself the least trouble in the world to give anybody the greatest satisfaction. Yet this is mere indolence of mind, not of body; his whole pleasure is outrageous exercise. Everything he promises to please you, is to cheat the present moment, and hush any complaint — I mean of words ; letters he never answers, not of business, not of his own business ; engagements of no sort he...
Page 20 - ... you wyll mak salle of ye wolle so sone as ys possyble, althowe you sell y' for vj' the stone, or as you wolde sell for your sealf, for my lorde so ernystly requered me at his departyng to se thosse pore men satysfyed as thowe y' had bene a matter dependyng uppon lyff, wherfore I force not to sustayne a lyttell losse therby to satysfy my lordes desyer, and so to send y...
Page 13 - ... will describe him to you if I can ; but don't let it pass your lips. His figure is charming; he has more of the easy, genuine air of a man of quality than ever you saw, though he has a little hesitation in his speech ; his address and manner are the most engaging imaginable. He has a good breeding and attention when he is with you that is even flattering ; you think he not only means to please, but designs to do everything that shall please you ; he promises, offers everything one can wish ;...
Page 13 - ... that shall please you ; he promises, offers everything one can wish — but this is all ; the instant he leaves you, you, all the world, are nothing to him — he would not give himself the least trouble in the * G«Mge third Eiri of Orfcri. world to give anybody the greatest satisfaction — yet this is mere indolence of mind, not of body ; his whole pleasure is outrageous exercise.
Page 14 - ... He has not only always slighted his mother, but was scarce decent to his rich old grandmother, when she had not a year to live, and courted him to receive her favours. You will ask me what passions he...
Page 20 - I nether may nor can deney you y' requeste, in my lordes absence, of myne owne awtoryte, ye and y' war a gretar matter, as if any good occasyon may serve you, so trye me descyring you furdar y' you wyll mak salle of ye wolle so sone as ys possyble, althowe you sell y...
Page 35 - Denbigh, who was made one of the Knights of the Bath at the coronation of Charles I...
Page 15 - HERE I am at Houghton, and alone ! in this spot, where (except two hours last month) I have not been in sixteen years ! Think what a crowd of reflections! No, Gray and forty churchyards could not furnish so many ; nay, I know one must feel them with greater indifference than I possess, to have patience to put them into verse. Here I am, probably for the last time of my life, though...

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