House and Street: The Domestic World of Servants and Masters in Nineteenth-Century Rio de Janeiro

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University of Texas Press, 1992 - Social Science - 212 pages
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During the later half of the nineteenth century, a majority of Brazilian women worked, most as domestic servants, either slave or free. House and Street re-creates the working and personal lives of these women, drawing on a wealth of documentation from archival, court, and church records. Lauderdale Graham traces the intricate and ambivalent relations that existed between masters and servants. She shows how for servants the house could be a place of protection—as well as oppression—while the street could be dangerous—but also more autonomous. She integrates her discoveries with larger events taking place in Rio de Janeiro during the period, including the epidemics of the 1850s, the abolition of slavery, the demolition of slums, and major improvements in sanitation during the first decade of the 1900s. House and Street was originally published by Cambridge University Press in 1988. For this paperback edition, Lauderdale Graham has provided a new introduction.
 

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Contents

The social landscape of house and street
10
The work
31
Private lives in public places
59
PART in MASTERS WORLD
91
Contagion and control
108
Postscript
137
Glossary of Portuguese words
193
Index
208
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