House of the Deaf

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Unbridled Books, Sep 1, 2006 - Fiction - 272 pages
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Ben Williamson has lost a daughter. While studying abroad in Madrid, Michelle Williamson was caught in a bombing by Basque separatists, a bombing that killed her and several members of the Guardia Civil at a post in a park. For Ben, this act of violence has left only questions, and at a moment of despair he decides to seek out the reasons for Michelle’s death. As Ben begins to learn about the endless tensions beneath the surface of Spanish culture, he finds that he wants someone to answer for his loss.

Ben’s other daughter, Annie, is also wrestling with the loss of her sister. When she follows her father to Spain, she finds a changed man.

Haunting and beautiful, House of the Deaf is the story of one man’s brush with terrorism and his quest to find answers.
 

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House of the Deaf

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Few novels handle the death of a child well; most go for sensationalism or bathos. This quiet novel powerfully renders one father's search for understanding when his oldest daughter is blown apart by ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
17
Section 3
29
Section 4
37
Section 5
41
Section 6
57
Section 7
73
Section 8
87
Section 9
99
Section 10
107
Section 11
121
Section 12
139
Section 13
159
Section 14
185
Section 15
201
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About the author (2006)

Lamar Herrin is the author of four previous novels: The Unwritten Chronicles of Robert E. Lee, The Rio Loja Ringmaster, American Baroque, and The Lies Boys Tell. His short stories have appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, and Epoch.

Herrin is also the recipient of a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts and is a professor of creative writing and contemporary literature at Cornell University. His memoir, published by Unbridled Books, is Romancing Spain.

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