Household Economics: A Course of Lectures in the School of Economics of the University of Wisconsin

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Putnam, 1896 - Families - 286 pages
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Page 30 - The broken sheds look'd sad and strange: Unlifted was the clinking latch; Weeded and worn the ancient thatch Upon the lonely moated grange. She only said, ' My life is dreary, He cometh not...
Page 93 - ... men have so long delighted in : forms and intricacies that do not necessarily imitate nature, but in which the hand of the craftsman is guided to work in the way that she does ; till the web, the cup, or the knife, look as natural, nay as lovely, as the green field, the river bank, or the mountain flint.
Page 146 - Parcel and part of all, I keep the festival, Fore-reach the good to be, And share the victory. I feel the earth move sunward, I join the great march onward, And take, by faith, while living, My freehold of thanksgiving.
Page 277 - The Constitution may be amended by a two-thirds vote of those present and voting at any annual meeting; provided that written notice of any proposed amendment shall be sent to the...
Page 84 - SANITARY CONDITION OF DWELLINGHOUSES IN TOWN AND COUNTRY. By George E. Waring, jun.
Page 232 - Man's work is from sun to sun — But a woman's work is never done.
Page 93 - These are the arts," he writes, " by means of which men have at all times more or less striven to beautify the familiar matters of every-day life...
Page 93 - For, and this is at the root of the whole matter, everything made by man's hands has a form, which must be either beautiful or ugly ; beautiful if it is in accord with Nature, and helps her; ugly if it is discordant with Nature, and thwarts her...
Page 76 - ... the woman, who rules over that small domain. The men of the house come and go; know little of the ins and outs of anything domestic ; are guided by what they are told, and are practically of no assistance whatever.
Page 123 - ... a bench that you can sit or lie upon ; next, a cupboard with drawers ; next, unless the cupboard or the book-case be very beautiful with painting or carving, you will want pictures or engravings such as you can afford — only not stop-gaps, but real works of art on the wall ; or else the wall itself must be ornamented with some beautiful and restful pattern...

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