How Babies Talk: The Magic and Mystery of Language in the First Three Years of Life

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Penguin, Jul 1, 2000 - Family & Relationships - 272 pages
3 Reviews
In their first three years of life, babies face the most complex learning endeavor they will ever undertake as human beings: They learn to talk. Now, as researchers make new forays into the mystery of the development of the human brain, Golinkoff and Hirsh-Pasek, both developmental psychologists and language experts, offer parents a powerfully insightful guidebook to how infantseven while in the wombbegin to learn language. Along the way, the authors provide parents with the latest scientific findings, developmental milestones, and important advice on how to create the most effective learning environments for their children. This book takes readers on a fascinating, vitally important exploration of the dance between nature and nurture, and explains how parents can help their children learn more successfully.
 

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User Review  - iBeth - LibraryThing

This account of how children learn language was fascinating and well-supported by research. It would be a fantastic shower gift for any parent who is interested in how their little ones learn to ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Sovranty - LibraryThing

The overall communication of this book is that there are many environmental (and heredity) factors involved in a child's development of language. The authors detail studies that attempt to example ... Read full review

Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
Chapter 1
Development from Before Birth to Three Months of Age The Fetus
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Epilogue
References
Index
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Roberta M. Golinkoff, Ph.D., is a professor in the departments of Educational Studies, Psychology, and Linguistics at the University of Delaware, a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, and the recipient of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship. She lives in Newark, Delaware.

Kathryn Hirsh-Pasek is the Stanley and Debra Lefkowitz Faculty Fellow in the Department of Psychology at Temple University and a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution. Her research examines the development of early language and literacy as well as the role of play in learning. With her long-term collaborator, Roberta Golinkoff, she is author of 14 books and hundreds of publications, she is the recipient of the American Psychological Association’s Bronfenbrenner Award, the American Psychological Association’s Award for Distinguished Service to Psychological Science, the Association for Psychological Science James McKeen Cattell Award, the Society for Research in Child Development, Distinguished Scientific Contributions to Child Development Award and the APA Distinguished Lecturer Award. Her book Becoming Brilliant: What the Science Tells Us About Raising Successful Children was a New York Times bestseller.

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