How Designers Think: The Design Process Demystified

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Architectural Press, 1997 - Architecture - 318 pages
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This third edition of 'How Designers Think' has been substantially rewritten following the second edition which was first published in 1990. Bryan Lawson has continued to try and understand how designers think, to explore how they might be better educated and to develop techniques, including computer-aided design, to assist them in their task. A completely new chapter on 'Designing with drawings' has been added and all the others have either been fully revised or wholly rewritten.

How Designers Think is based on Bryan Lawson's many observations of designers at work, interviews with designers and their clients and collaborators. This extended work is the culmination of twenty-five years' research and shows the author's belief that we all can learn to design better. The creative mind continues to have power to surprise and this book aims to nurture and extend this creativity. This book is not intended as an authoritative description of how designers should think but to provide helpful advice on how to develop an understanding of design.

'How Designers Think' will be of great interest, not only to designers seeking a greater insight into their own thought processes, but also to students of design in general from undergraduate level upward.

* An original look at the changing role of the designer in society
* Fully illustrated
* Completely new chapter on 'Designing with drawings'

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User Review  - jonas.lowgren - LibraryThing

The author discusses design thinking, design processes and design strategies in architecture but his ideas are quite general and relevant also to interaction design. A rather well-known part of the ... Read full review

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About the author (1997)

Bryan Lawson is a Professor of Architecture at the University of Sheffield. He is however both an architect and a psychologist, which has enabled him to study the nature of the design process.

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