How Enemies Are Made: Towards a Theory of Ethnic and Religious Conflict

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Berghahn Books, Sep 30, 2008 - Social Science - 206 pages
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In popular perception cultural differences or ethnic affiliation are factors that cause conflict or political fragmentation although this is not borne out by historical evidence. This book puts forward an alternative conflict theory. The author develops a decision theory which explains the conditions under which differing types of identification are preferred. Group identification is linked to competition for resources like water, territory, oil, political charges, or other advantages. Rivalry for resources can cause conflicts but it does not explain who takes whose side in a conflict situation. This book explores possibilities of reducing violent conflicts and ends with a case study, based on personal experience of the author, of conflict resolution.

 

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Contents

Ch 1Why we need a new conflict theory
3
Ch 2The question
13
Ch 3How this volume is organised
21
Part IITheoretical frame
23
Ch 4A decision theory of identification
25
Ch 5The necessity for strategies of inclusion and exclusion
35
Ch 6The conceptual instruments of exclusion and inclusion
43
Ch 7Economics as sociologysociology as economics
53
Ch 10Purity and power in Islamic and nonIslamic societies a nd the spectrer of fundamentalism
75
Ch 11Language and ethnicity
99
Part IIIPractical frame
105
Ch 12Conflict resolution
107
how to be a conflict analyst
149
Ch 14An update from 2007
161
References
171
Index
183

Ch 8Markets of violence and the freedom of choice
55
Ch 9Ethnic emblems diacritical features identity markerssome east African examples
61

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About the author (2008)

Günther Schlee was a Professor at Bielefeld until 1999. He currently is the director of the section Integration and Conflict at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology, Halle, focusing on Africa, Central Asia, and Europe. His publications include Identities on the Move: Clanship and Pastoralism in Northern Kenya (International African Institute, 1989), How Enemies are Made (Berghahn, 2008), Rendille Proverbs in their Social and legal Context (with Karaba Sahado) and Boran Proverbs in their Cultural Context (with Abdullahi Shongolo) (both Cologne: Rüdiger Köppe).

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