How Long Is a Piece of String?: More Hidden Mathematics of Everyday Life

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Pavilion Books, Jan 1, 2005 - Mathematics - 182 pages
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Why do weather forecasters get it wrong? What are the best tactics for playing "Who Wants to be a Millionaire?" and "The Weakest Link"? And what is the link between a tin of baked beans and a men's urinal? These and many other questions are answered in this book. It is for anyone wanting to remind themselves - or discover for the first time - that maths is relevant to almost everything we do. Dating, cooking, travelling by car, gambling and ranking sportsmen all have links with intriguing mathematical problems that are explained in this book. It reveals the secrets behind some of the best con tricks and the hidden workings of the taxi meter, and explains how epidemics start and stop.

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User Review  - MartinBodek - LibraryThing

I've been reading a lot of books lately on the horrors of innumeracy. It was a pleasure to turn the reading experience on its head and instead read about the joy of numeracy! I knew the prequel left much more to said on the table, and the sequel delivered on that notion. Much fun. Read full review


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About the author (2005)

Rob Eastaway is a writer, speaker and consultant. His books include the bestselling What is a Googly? (9781861056290) and Why Do Buses Come In Threes? (9781861058621). He jointly devised the system now used to officially rank international cricketers and lives in London, where he is a keen weekend cricketer and occasional golfer.

Wyndham, a former junior international bridge player, runs a market research company.

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