How Many Doctors Do We Need?: A Policy Agenda for the United States in the 1990s Based on the Tenth Private Sector Conference, 1985

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Duncan Yaggy, Patricia Hodgson
Duke University Press, 1986 - Business & Economics - 163 pages
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This volume addresses the public and private policies affecting physician supply in the United States, focusing on the physician surplus, market forces, and geographic distribution of physicians, life-style choices and evolving practice patterns, market influences of foreign medical graduates, the university's role in establishing priorities for medical education, and other pertinent topics.
 

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Contents

Historical Perspective ROSEMARY A STEVENS
11
Correcting Surpluses and Shortages in Medical Specialties
28
Methodological Problems in Assessing Physician Demand Need
41
The Universitys Role in Establishing Priorities for Medical
55
Managing Quality and Quantity in Residency Training Programs
60
The Experience in Great Britain JOHN LISTER
70
Discussion
80
3
89
Public and Private Options for Assessing and Managing Physician
97
Comments
106
Discussion
134
Summary
147
Index
157

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