How One of You Can Bring the Two of You Together

Front Cover
Potter/TenSpeed/Harmony, Jan 18, 2012 - Psychology - 320 pages
0 Reviews
Susan Page's groundbreaking approach to relationships gives readers the tools and encouragement they need to bring positive changes to their relationship, even when their partners are unwilling to do the work. Based on the premise that what you do in a relationship makes changes faster than anything you discuss, Page introduces the concept of "Loving Leadership" and offers fourteen empowering and doable strategies for recapturing the positive feelings, including how to:



Overcome resentment and move beyond blameSolve major problems--one at a timeRecapture lost intimacy



Step-by-step, Page demonstrates that with tangible goals, and new ways of thinking, one partner can bring new levels of harmony and love to a relationship.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

How one of you can bring the two of you together: breakthrough strategies to resolve your conflicts and reignite your love

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Page (Now That I'm Married, Why Isn't Everything Perfect?, LJ 1/94) believes in approaching things differently. Contrary to the mainstream "couples" approach to relational counseling, Page ... Read full review

Contents

How to Vork Alone on a lwoPcrson Relationship
3
Give Away the Booby Prize and Go for the Gold
29
Learn ERAP Emergency Resentment Abatement Procedure
50
SHORTTERM STRATEGIES FOR CREATING
85
Resolve Your Most Upsetting Problemsby Yourself
115
Discover How One of You Can Bring the Two of
163
LONGTERM STRATEGIES FOR KEEPING YOUR
185
Practice Taking Care of Yourself
213
SelfCare and Good Will As a Blend
246
WHEN YOU SET CHANGE IN MOTION
261
The Good Marriage The Good Self
279
Bibliography
291
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2012)

She holds a Master of Divinity degree from San Francisco Theological Seminary, was a campus minister at Washington University in St. Louis and at Columbia University in New York. She has been a student of Buddhism since 1976 and founded and directed the nation's first university-based human sexuality program at the University of California at Berkeley. Since 1980, she has devoted herself full time to writing about relationships and working with couples and singles. She lives in Berkeley, California.

Bibliographic information