How to Be a Great Coach: 24 Lessons for Turning on the Productivity of Every Employee

Front Cover
McGraw Hill Professional, Jul 1, 2008 - Business & Economics - 128 pages

Today's worker is empowered and intelligent, and no longer can you expect overbearing, high-pressure management tactics to improve performance. In the modern workplace, managers are discovering that they must work in partnership with their employees, providing them with the tools they need for success by first determining exactly what those tools are.

How to Be a Great Coach provides guidelines, best practices, and state-of-the-art approaches for working with, instead of against, your employees, boosting their motivation, performance, and productivity. This results-focused book examines 24 innovative and proven approaches for getting the best efforts from your employees by giving your best, and earning their respect by first learning how to:

  • Solicit their opinions-and take them seriously
  • Be willing to take the hit for your own mistakes
  • Ask targeted questions and patiently await answers
  • Communicate your willingness to hear complaints
  • Foster independence, not subservience
  • Explain your expectations clearly
  • Always advocate for your employees

When your employees do well, you do well. Learn all about today's most effective coaching methods--what they are, how they work, and how you can use them to dramatically improve the performance of your employees--in the focused, hands-on leadership guide How to Be a Great Coach.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Be a coach
5
Motivate them
9
Ask for their opinions
13
Admit your mistakes
17
Be accessible
21
Be a good listener
25
Ask good questions
29
Welcome complaints
33
Solve problems together
57
Deliver the bad news personally
61
Dont act out of anger
65
Avoid memo mania
69
Manage meetings
73
Train them
77
Stress the positive
81
Reward what you want
85

Coach oneonone
37
Watch your language
41
Celebrate the differences
45
Empower independent employees
49
Make the call
53
Provide positive feedback
89
Advocate for your employees
93
Just get started
97
The McGrawHill Mighty Managers Handbooks
100
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Marshall Cook is a professor in the Division of Continuing Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is the author of nearly a dozen books, including Effective Coaching and Time Management.

Bibliographic information