How to Become Extinct

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D.R. Godine, Publisher, 2008 - Humor - 125 pages
2 Reviews
In these 40 brief, witty essays, Will Cuppy, a perennially perturbed hermit who thought life was out to get him, turns his unflinching attention on those members of the animal kingdom whose habits are disagreeable, whose appearances are repellent, and whose continued existence need not necessarily be a foregone conclusion.

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User Review  - antiquary - LibraryThing

While not as wildy funny as The Decline and Fall of Practically Everybody, this is another agreeable example of Cuppy's humor, and has the advantage of having been completed in his lifetime under his own supervision. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - pjsullivan - LibraryThing

This one is mostly about fish, reptiles, and Aristotle, not necessarily in that order. (You will find Aristotle under reptiles.) Plus snippets about some of the animals that have mastered the art of ... Read full review

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About the author (2008)

William Steig was born in Brooklyn, New York, on November 14, 1907, and spent his childhood in the Bronx. Steig found an outlet for his talent by creating cartoons for the high school newspaper. After high school graduation, Steig spent two years at City College, three years at the National Academy, and five days at the Yale School of Fine Arts before dropping out. During his early days as a free-lance artist, he supplemented his income with work in advertising, although he intensely disliked it. He illustrated for the The New Yorker, beginning in 1930. During the 1940s, Steig's creativity found a more agreeable outlet when he began carving figurines in wood; his sculptures are on display as part of the collection in the historic home of Franklin D. Roosevelt in Hyde Park, New York, and in several museums in New England. In 1967, Bob Kraus, a fellow cartoonist at The New Yorker, was in the process of organizing Windmill Books, an imprint for Harper & Row. Kraus suggested that Steig try writing and illustrating a book for a young audience. The result was Steig's letter-puzzle book entitled C D B!, published in 1968. Roland the Minstrel Pig, was published the same year. With his very next title, Sylvester and the Magic Pebble, he won the Caldecott Medal. The Amazing Bone was also a Caldecott Honor Book.In 1972, Steig published his first children's novel, Dominic, which won the Christopher Award. Abel's Island followed and was a Newberry Honor Book. William Steig died in October 3, 2003 in Boston Massachusettes.

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