How to Edit Technical Documents, Volume 2

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ABC-CLIO, 1995 - Business & Economics - 186 pages
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"How to Edit Technical Documents" is the most concise and clearly presented discussion of the editor's role and responsibilities to the writer, the reader, and the publishing process--including changes that result from technological advances in editing. The authors describe the demands of communicating complicated information, in print and on screen, without diminishing the expressive power of language. As a result, users learn the skills necessary to become contributing members of any organization that requires informed and imaginative editors.

 

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Contents

A Changing Profession
1
Chapter 2 Editing for Content
10
Chapter 3 Cutting Copy
18
Chapter 4 Document Organization
28
Chapter 5 Words
39
Chapter 6 Sentences with Style
52
Chapter 7 Paragraphs
67
Chapter 8 Grammar
73
Chapter 11 Marking Manuscripts
113
Dealing with Typescripts under Deadline
120
Chapter 13 Getting Along with Authors
139
Appendix A Editing Technical Manuals
147
Appendix B Editing Technical Proposals
158
Appendix C About Style Manuals
168
Appendix D Bibliography of Cited and Other Useful Sources
170
INDEX
177

Chapter 9 Punctuation
93
Chapter 10 Editing Graphics
100

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1995)

Donald W. Bush is a lecturer in technical writing at San Diego State University and a former technical editor for McDonnell Douglas, St. Louis, Missouri, where he worked for 25 years. He has extensive experience in journalism, public relations, and technical editing, including seven years as public relations supervisor at Southwestern Bell Telephone Company. He has taught writing and editing courses at various universities and colleges and has written numerous articles and book reviews, mostly on technical writing and editing.

Charles P. Campbell, PhD, is professor emeritus of English, Humanities Department, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in Socorro, New Mexico. Previously, he taught English at several other universities and colleges. He has written and edited numerous articles, reports, book reviews, and films, and is a frequent presenter and lecturer on the subject of technical communication.

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