How to Fossilize Your Hamster: And Other Amazing Experiments for the Armchair Scientist

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Henry Holt and Company, Jan 22, 2008 - Science - 256 pages
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Outrageously entertaining and educational experiments from the team behind the phenomenal international bestseller Does Anything Eat Wasps?

How can you measure the speed of light with a bar of chocolate and a microwave oven? To keep a banana from decaying, are you better off rubbing it with lemon juice or refrigerating it? How can you figure out how much your head weighs? Mick O'Hare, who created the New Scientist's popular science sensations Does Anything Eat Wasps? and Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze?, has the answers.

In this fascinating and irresistible new book, O'Hare and the New Scientist team guide you through one hundred intriguing experiments that show essential scientific principles (and human curiosity) in action. Explaining everything from the unusual chemical reaction between Mentos and cola that provokes a geyser to the geological conditions necessary to preserve a family pet for eternity, How to Fossilize Your Hamster is fun, hands-on science that everyone will want to try at home.

 

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How to fossilize your hamster: and other amazing experiments for the armchair scientist

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If you've ever wondered why a dried spaghetti noodle, when bent, always breaks into three or more pieces, rest assured that none less than Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman devoted hours ... Read full review

Contents

IN THE KITCHEN
1
IN THE DINING NOOK
48
IN THE FAMILY ROOM
69
IN THE STUDY OR THE OFFICE
99
IN THE BATHROOM
126
IN THE GARAGE OR THE UTILITY ROOM
148
IN THE BACKYARDAND FURTHER AFIELD
171
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
225
INDEX
229
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Mick O'Hare is the production editor of New Scientist and the editor of the international bestsellers Does Anything Eat Wasps? and Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze? He lives in London. New Scientist is the bestselling and fastest growing science magazine in the world.

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