How to Live on 24 Hours a Day: with The Human Machine

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Courier Corporation, Mar 14, 2012 - Self-Help - 128 pages
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Leave your everyday concerns behind and start focusing on your true desires! Achieve your full potential with proven techniques on: • Time-saving • Reflection • Concentration • Study and more One of the first self-help books ever published, this classic of personal time management has inspired millions to make the most of "the daily miracle": the fresh allowance of time that comes with each new day. This edition features a bonus offering of Bennett's The Human Machine, a guide to improving social relationships.
 

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About the author (2012)

Arnold Bennett was born on May 27, 1867 in Hanley, Staffordshire, England. He began his working career as a law clerk and later he left the legal field and became an editor for the magazine Woman. His first novel was "A Man from the North." He wrote several novels set in Hanley, the town where he was born. These are known as the Five Town novels. Other titles include "The Babylon Hotel," "The Truth about an Author," and "How to Live on 24 Hours a Day." Bennett won the 1923 James Tait Black Memorial Prize for his novel "Riceyman Steps." "The Journal of Arnold Bennett" was published posthumously in three volumes. Bennett was also the author of "Hugo" which was made into a major motion picture in 2011 starring Jude law and Ben Kingsley, directed by Martin Scorsese. During WWI, Bennett was Director of Propaganda for France at the Ministry of Information. (At that time "propaganda" did not have the negative connotations it would have later in the twentieth century.) This appointment was based on the recommendation of Lord Beaverbrook, who also recommended him as Deputy Minister of that department at the end of the war. Bennett refused a knighthood in 1918. He died in London of typhoid fever on March 27, 1931.

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