How to Make Friends: Building Resilience and Supportive Peer Groups

Front Cover
SAGE, Aug 7, 2008 - Education - 152 pages
1 Review
Includes CD-Rom

Pupils are rarely taught the principles of effective co-operation although being able to work effectively as part of a group is critical in all contexts; school, life and work.

The book is based on the author's practical experience of running the programme in schools and is underpinned by research into the development of pro-social behaviour and friendship skills.

The 26 sessions are arranged in the sequence of the alphabet from Attitude to the Zest for life. In each session there is a poster and a 'take away' activity as well as full facilitators' notes for whole class introduction, pair and share tasks and a plenary. A unique feature of the programme is that it addresses the development of non-verbal communication, the ability to read social cues.

The sessions raise awareness and understanding of the interpersonal skills necessary for friendships, including communication and co-operation.

The teaching sessions cover topics such as:

- Reciprocity

- Commitment

- Giving and sharing

- Trust

- Specific thinking skills.

The programme is intended for whole class work but would also be suitable for small groups.

 

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I was wondering I wanted to make costaphobic Effective interpersonal skills are crucial for children's social and emotional development yet often we hope these will just develop, to be caught rather than taught. This book is based on the author's practical experience of running the programme in schools and is underpinned by research into the development of pro-social behaviour and friendship skills. The 26 sessions are arranged in the sequence of the alphabet from 'active listening' to 'zero tolerance for bullying'. The difference between being friends and being friendly is a skill necessary to help create friendly relationships. The sessions raise awareness and understanding of the interpersonal skills including communicating and co-operating for friendship. Social skills are critical but other qualities are essential. The sessions highlight: " reciprocity " commitment " giving and sharing " trust. The programme is intended for whole class work but would also be suitable for small groups. There are comprehensive facilitators notes, all necessary resources, partner and group work, plenary and extensive ideas. This is an essential resource for all those who think teaching relationship skills is a crucial area of education. 

Contents

1 A is for Attitude
19
2 B is for Bounce Back
24
3 C is for Compliments
29
4 D is for Different
34
5 E is for Empathy
38
6 F is for Fair
43
7 G is for Get Over It
48
8 H is for Help Yourself
53
15 O is for Open Up
86
16 P is for Persuasion
90
17 Q is for Quarrels
95
18 R is for Receiving Compliments
100
19 S is for Saying Sorry
107
20 T is for Take Turns Talking
112
21 U is for Upset
117
22 V is for Value
122

9 I is for Invitations
58
10 J is for Joining in
62
11 K is for Keep Your Word
67
12 L is for Left Out
71
13 Manage that Mood
77
14 N is for Nice Ways of Saying No
82
23 W is for WinWin
126
24 X is for XRay Eyes
130
25 Y is for You
135
26 Z is for Zest for Living
141
Certificate
142
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About the author (2008)

Ruth MacConville is the Head of the Special Educational Needs service, based in Ealing.

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