How to Read Chinese Poetry: A Guided Anthology

Front Cover
Zong-qi Cai
Columbia University Press, Dec 28, 2007 - Poetry - 544 pages

In this "guided" anthology, experts lead students through the major genres and eras of Chinese poetry from antiquity to the modern time. The volume is divided into 6 chronological sections and features more than 140 examples of the best shi, sao, fu, ci, and qu poems. A comprehensive introduction and extensive thematic table of contents highlight the thematic, formal, and prosodic features of Chinese poetry, and each chapter is written by a scholar who specializes in a particular period or genre. Poems are presented in Chinese and English and are accompanied by a tone-marked romanized version, an explanation of Chinese linguistic and poetic conventions, and recommended reading strategies. Sound recordings of the poems are available online free of charge. These unique features facilitate an intense engagement with Chinese poetical texts and help the reader derive aesthetic pleasure and insight from these works as one could from the original.

The companion volume How to Read Chinese Poetry Workbook presents 100 famous poems (56 are new selections) in Chinese, English, and romanization, accompanied by prose translation, textual notes, commentaries, and recordings.

Contributors: Robert Ashmore (Univ. of California, Berkeley); Zong-qi Cai; Charles Egan (San Francisco State); Ronald Egan (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara); Grace Fong (McGill); David R. Knechtges (Univ. of Washington); Xinda Lian (Denison); Shuen-fu Lin (Univ. of Michigan); William H. Nienhauser Jr. (Univ. of Wisconsin); Maija Bell Samei; Jui-lung Su (National Univ. of Singapore); Wendy Swartz (Columbia); Xiaofei Tian (Harvard); Paula Varsano (Univ. of California, Berkeley); Fusheng Wu (Univ. of Utah)

 

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User Review  - A_musing - LibraryThing

Robert Frost called poetry that which is "lost in translation", but this marvelous volume does its best to remedy that situation. Zong-qi Cai assembles an intense band of absolutely passionate ... Read full review

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User Review  - mvrdrk - LibraryThing

Audio files for many of the poems are provided on the columbia.edu web site. The full address is given in the Preface. -- My father loved this book! He opened it before the winter holiday (I forgot to ... Read full review

Contents

To the Tune Beautiful Lady Yu Li Yu
255
To the Tune Butterflies Lingering over Flowers attrib Ouyang Xiu
257
To the Tune Sand in SilkWashing Stream Yan Shu
258
106
260
Long Song Lyrics Manci
262
To the Tune Eight Beats of a Ganzhou Song Liu Yong
264
To the Tune Prelude to the River Tune Su Shi
268
Meditation on the Past at Red Cliff Su Shi
270

the han Dynasty
54
Fu on the Imperial Park Sima Xiangru 61
76
Music Bureau Poems Yuefu
84
Mulberry Along the Lane anon
96
The Nineteen Old Poems
103
the six Dynasties
119
C6 2
126
C6 6
133
New Topics
141
C7 5
148
C7 9
152
the tang Dynasty
159
C15 5
170
C8 2
171
Heptasyllabic Regulated Verse Qiyan Lüshi
181
C9 4
188
C9 8
195
C10 2 C10 3
205
C10 9
211
105
224
Continuation and Changes
226
Paula varsano C11 1 Moved by Events I Encounter No 6 Chen Ziang
227
A Song on Ascending Youzhou Terrace Chen Ziang
230
Sent to Minister Lu Xuzhou Li Bai
232
Planting Flowers on the Eastern Slope No 1 Bai Juyi
238
Planting Flowers on the Eastern Slope No 2 Bai Juyi
239
the Five Dynasties anD the song Dynasty
243
Short Song Lyrics Xiaoling
245
To the Tune Crows Call at Night attrib Li Yu
246
To the Tune Southern Tune No 1 anon
249
To the Tune Southern Tune No 2 anon
250
To the Tune On the Water Clock at Night Wen Tingyun
251
To the Tune BuddhaLike Barbarian Wen Tingyun
253
To the Tune Audience at Golden Gate Wei Zhuang
254
To the Tune One Beat Followed by Another a Long Tune Li Qingzhao
273
To the Tune Congratulating the Bridegroom Xin Qiji
276
To the Tune Groping for Fish Xin Qiji
280
Long Song Lyrics on Objects Yongwu Ci
286
Secret Fragrance Jiang Kui
287
Dappled Shadows Jiang Kui
288
Prelude to the Orioles Song Wu Wenying
302
109
305
Ancient and Recent Styles
308
Small Plum Tree in a Garden in the Hills No 1 Lin Bu
309
Lament for My Wife Nos 1 2 3 Mei Yaochen
311
Seeing Off Canliao Su Shi
313
Written on Master Huyins Wall No 1 Wang Anshi
315
the yuan ming anD Qing Dynasties
327
C16 3
334
C16 6
340
C16 10
346
121
351
Shi Poetry of the Ming and Qing Dynasties
354
C17 4
360
C17 7
369
C17 11 C17 12 C17 13
375
133
377
DiCtion
392
C18 2
394
ProsoDy
398
Phonetic Transcriptions of EnteringTone Characters
401
Three Quatrains No 3 Du
413
202
419
135
420
379
423
213
425
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About the author (2007)

Zong-qi Cai is professor of Chinese and comparative literature at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of The Matrix of Lyric Transformation: Poetic Modes and Self-Presentation in Early Chinese Pentasyllabic Poetry (Michigan, 1996) and Configurations of Comparative Poetics: Three Perspectives on Western and Chinese Literary Criticism (Hawai'i, 2002), and is the editor of A Chinese Literary Mind: Culture, Creativity, and Rhetoric in Wenxin dialong (Stanford, 2001) and Chinese Aesthetics: The Ordering of Literature, the Arts, and the Universe in the Six Dynasties (Hawai'i, 2004).

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