How to Spin Gold: A Woman's Tale

Front Cover
Station Hill Arts, 1997 - Fiction - 176 pages
0 Reviews
This startling new retelling of the classic Rumpelstiltskin story invites us to experience the power of transformation - the heart of all the best fairytales.
The spinner of the story begins life without a name. As the youngest daughter of an impoverished family, her parents simply never bothered to name her. She is shunned by her village, not only for her namelessness, but for a mysterious trinity of identifying marks: a moon-shape on her left cheek, a shortened left leg, and a left eye that has no color. Only Aurelie, the miller's cherished daughter, sees past the goblin strangeness of "the girl with the silver eye" to her core of power and strength.
Embittered and defiant, our narrator decides to leave everything she knows and throw herself at the mercy of the wild. There she finds the Wise Woman of the Western Wood, revered for her healing skills but feared as a witch. She becomes her reluctant apprentice, hoping that this enigmatic figure has the power to reveal her true name and identity.
Even as she succeeds her teacher as Wise Woman, the narrator's life remains bound in love and jealousy with the beautiful miller's daughter, who so effortlessly wins and scorns all the nameless woman yearns for. When Aurelie renews the bond between them at the hour of her greatest need, we learn the complex truth behind this simple children's tale.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
17
Section 3
27
Copyright

16 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1997)

Elizabeth Cunningham is the direct descendant of nine generations of Episcopal priests. When she was not in church or school, she read fairytales and fantasy novels or wandered in the enchanted wood of an overgrown, abandoned estate next door to the rectory. Her religious background, the magic of fairytales, and the numinous experience of nature continue to inform her work.

Bibliographic information