How to Survive Getting Into College: By Hundreds of Students Who Did

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Hundreds Books
Hundreds of Heads Books, Mar 1, 2009 - Study Aids - 240 pages
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Getting into college is a national obsession among high school students and their parents, and it’s only getting worse. Each year, there are more applications and tougher admissions standards at competitive schools. In a tight job market, the stakes are higher than ever. Businesses, books, and programs exist to help students win acceptance to top schools, but why not go to the real source — recent high school graduates who survived the college admissions process. In How to Survive Getting Into College, hundreds of students share their hard-won wisdom, thoughts, strategies, struggles, and even failures. Filled with tips, tricks, humor, and horror stories, as well as practical advice on applications, interviews, and financial aid, the book is a lifeline for high school juniors and seniors.
 

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Contents

Contents
v
Introduction
vii
Launching The College Process
1
Studying Scoring High
27
On Essays Applications Interviews
53
Activities That Help You Stand Out
87
5 Love at First Sight? Visiting Schools
105
Scholarships Financial Aid Loans
129
Acceptance or Rejection
177
Picking the Right School
195
Imagining the College Life
217
Your ToDo List
231
Good Stuff That Doesnt Fit Anywhere Else
245
Really Useful Web Sites
253
Credits
255
Copyright

7 Help Getting Support From Counselors Parents
151

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Page 13 - I wanted to prove to myself that I could do it. I was in heaven when I got the scores back.

About the author (2009)

Special Editor Rachel Korn is a U.S. college advisor and consultant living in Tel Aviv, Israel. She attended Brandeis University as a Justice Brandeis Scholar, and Harvard University, where she earned a Master's Degree in Higher Education Administration. Rachel worked on the admissions staffs at Wellesley College, Brandeis University and The University of Pennsylvania where she visited hundreds of high schools across the nation, interviewed prospective students, and read and advised committees on approximately 10,000 applications. She has been an active member of several professional organizations including regional chapters of the National Association for College Admissions Counseling and The College Board.

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