The American Girls Handy Book: How to Amuse Yourself and Others

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Charles Scribner's Sons, 1887 - Acting - 474 pages
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HIS is the children’s own day, and no assumption of dignity on the part of their elders can deter them from exercising the privileges granted to them by acknowledged custom and precedent.

“April fool! April fool!” cries my little nephew, as he dances with delight to see his aunt walk out of the room with a piece of white paper dangling from a hooked pin, attached to her dress.

“April fool! April fool!” shout the children in the street, thus announcing the success of some practical joke.

“April fool!” laughs everyone at the table, when some unfortunate bites into a brown, wholesome-looking cruller, only to find it a delusion and a snare, the coat of a cruller, but the inside of cotton.

“April fool! April fool!” is what even the little sparrows seem to chirp, as with a “s-w-h-e-r-r” they sweep down from the tree and, frightening away the kitten, take forcible possession of her bone. What does all this mean? Why is the first day of April called “All-Fools-Day,” and when or where did the custom of the day originate? Who can tell? No one seems to know. Even the derivation of the word April does not appear to have been definitely settled, and this saucy month, with her mischievous tricks and pranks, her surprises and mysteries, fools and puzzles our wisest men.

Through many centuries the observance of All-Fools-Day has descended to us. In many climes and many countries this day is chosen as the proper time for playing tricks on the unsuspecting.

“Festum Fatuorum,” or “Fools’ Holiday,” is what it was called in England at the time of the arrival of the early Christians in that country.

Easily caught like the mackerel, which are plentiful on the French coast in April and are said to be deficient in understanding, the April fool in France derives his name from that fish, and is called “Poisson d’Avril” or “April Fish,” and again, “Silly Mackerel.” From the cuckoo, a bird that does not know enough to build its own nest, the appellation of “gowk” is taken, and is given to the foolish one in Scotland who allows himself to be duped on this day.

 

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Contents

II
11
III
25
IV
31
V
53
VI
69
VII
79
VIII
89
IX
103
XXIV
236
XXV
239
XXVII
265
XXIX
270
XXX
293
XXXI
300
XXXII
313
XXXIII
332

X
121
XI
129
XII
137
XIII
149
XV
157
XVII
167
XVIII
175
XIX
183
XX
199
XXI
215
XXII
222
XXIII
227
XXXVI
351
XXXVII
362
XXXIX
378
XLI
393
XLIII
401
XLV
411
XLVII
427
XLVIII
436
XLIX
449
LI
456
LII
462
Copyright

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Page 2 - So in the East and in the West, in the North and in the South...
Page 61 - The choice of sides, and the right to serve in the first game, shall be decided by toss; provided that, if the winner of the toss choose the right to serve, the other player shall have...
Page 40 - Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall: Humpty Dumpty had a great fall. All the King's horses and all the King's men Couldn't put Humpty Dumpty in his place again.
Page 64 - The striker-out wins a stroke if the server serve two consecutive faults ; or if he fail to return the ball in play ; or if he return the ball in play so that it drops outside of his opponent's court ; or if he otherwise lose a stroke as provided by law 18.
Page 66 - At the beginning of the next set, either partner of the pair which struck out in the last game of the last set may serve, and the same privilege is given to their opponents in the second game of the new set.
Page 65 - ... for the second game. The partner of the player who served in the first game shall serve in the third, and the partner of the player who served in the second game shall serve in the fourth, and the same order shall be maintained in all the subsequent games of the set.
Page 63 - After a fault the Server shall serve again from the same Court from which he served that fault, unless it was a fault because served from the wrong Court.
Page 392 - In the midst of this delightful little aquatic group, we three sat in our little skin-bound tub (like the " three wise men of Gotham, who went to sea in a bowl...
Page 63 - Law 7, or if the ball served, drop in the net or beyond the Service- Line, or if it drop out of Court, or in the wrong Court.
Page 67 - Half-court: the players having agreed into which court the giver of the odds shall play, the latter loses a stroke if the ball, returned by him, drop outside any of the lines which bound that court.

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