How to be a Successful Frauditor: A Practical Guide to Investigating Fraud in the Workplace for Internal Auditors and Managers

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John Wiley & Sons, May 17, 2010 - Business & Economics - 416 pages
This book shows how anyone who finds they need to investigate a fraud at work can conduct a successful investigation and maximise their chances of recovering stolen money. Drawing on the experiences of the author, including his role in a number of high profile cases at two organisations at the heart of government, the Treasury and the Metropolitan Police, the book is peppered with real life examples and case studies of the ‘frauditor’s’ experiences, and lessons learned the hard way including the cases of:

• The linguist who was lost for words

• Doctoring the suits at the hospital

• A magician at work

• Corporate credit cards for cops

Readable, and written to de-bunk the mysteries of fraud investigation, this book includes interactive case studies to develop the reader’s skills in effective fraud detection and investigation.

 

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Contents

Fraudbasics
19
PLANNING AND MANAGING
43
INVESTIGATION TECHNIQUES
109
Advanced techniques
171
APPENDICES
351
B Red Book 2
359
Fraud risk wheelthewheelof misfortune
373
F Formulae and table to assist advanced techniques
381
G Detecting abuse in credit card transactions
387
by Richard Kusnierz 387 H Notes
395
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About the author (2010)

Peter Tickner, Reading, UK, Director of Peter Tickner Associates Ltd. Peter was the Director of Internal Audit for London’s Metropolitan Police Service (‘Scotland Yard’) between 1995 and 2009. In his early career he was an external auditor for the NHS. Peter was also Head of Internal Audit at Her Majesty’s Treasury between 1988 and 1995. He has held past positions as a Director of the Institute of Internal Auditors (UK and Ireland), Chair of the Editorial Board for the IIA Journal and as a senior lecturer at the Civil Service College. He is a regular speaker and presenter at international antifraud and corruption conferences and through his company provides training and presentations to help organisations deal with fraud and corruption in the workplace.

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