How to Buy a Horse: Containing Instructions for the Choice Or Rejection of a Horse from His Shape, Appearance, Action, Soundness, Or Defects ... To which are Added Observations on the First Treatment of Some Injuries and Diseases ...

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Sherwood, Gilbert, and Piper, 1840 - Horses - 250 pages
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Page 250 - ELAINE'S VETERINARY ART ; a Treatise on the Anatomy, Physiology, and Curative Treatment of the Diseases of the Horse, Neat Cattle and Sheep. Seventh Edition, revised and enlarged by C. STEEL, MRCVSL 8vo.
Page 249 - Fishing, &c., With Observations on the Breaking and Training of Dogs and Horses ; Also the Management of Fowling Pieces, and all other Sporting Implements.
Page 249 - BARRENGER ; the remainder cut on Wood, by CLENNELL, THOMPSON, AUSTIN, and BEWICK. The author's object 'has been, to present, in as compressed a form as real utility would admit, Instructions in all the various Field...
Page 31 - But, be it remembered, horses invariably have tushes, which mares very rarely do. Before the age of six is arrived at the tush is full grown, and has a slight groove on its internal surface (which generally disappears with age, the tush itself becoming more rounded and blunt), and at six the kernel or mark is worn out of the middle front teeth. There will still be a difference of color in the centre of the tooth.
Page 178 - ... in one corner of his manger, and as much beans in another, with perhaps a couple of chopped carrots, and it is ten to one, unless he be severely overmarked, but he will soon nibble sufficient of one or the other to sustain him until his appetite completely returns. It is by no means an uncommon notion, that, if horses are to be got into condition for work they should be allowed to drink but a very small quantity of water.
Page 249 - It would be difficult to imagine any selection from the great storehouse of Nature more likely to merit general attention, or to excite general interest, than the one to which we now invite Public Notice. Of all the animals...
Page 249 - BRITISH FIELD SPORTS; embracing PRACTICAL INSTRUCTIONS in SHOOTING, HUNTING, COURSING, RACING, FISHING, &c. ; with Observations on the Breaking and Training of Dogs and Horses; also, the Management of Fowling-pieces, and all other Sporting Implements. By WILLIAM HENRY SCOTT. %* This Work is beautifully printed, on fine paper, and illustrated with upwards of Fifty...
Page 178 - It is by no means an uncommon notion, that, if horses are to be got into condition for work they should be allowed to drink but a very small quantity of water. On what physiological basis this opinion is founded, I confess appears to me to be a perfect mystery. Nevertheless as many persons adopt this treatment, it is fitting to notice it. For my own part I have ever found that it is an extremely bad plan to stint a horse in his water, and have consequently always made a practice of leaving plenty...
Page 11 - The fore-legs should be muscular down to the knee, and thence, like the hind-legs, flat and sinewy. With respect to the foot, it should be nearly circular, gradually increasing in size as it proceeds downwards. Its inclination outwards should not be so great as that of the pastern ; if it slope very much forwards, it is a chance if it be not in a state bordering upon disease, and its obliquity, throwing the horse too much on his heel, produces tenderness of the part and straining of the back sinew...
Page 180 - ... given to him; he will then feel to a certain degree satisfied with what he gets : whereas, by taking from him what he expects to have, he becomes fretful and discontented. In the first instance he makes up his mind to slake his thirst with a short allowance of water; whereas in the second his just expectations are baulked in mid career, and his imagination cheated as it were in the height of his enjoyment : and there is much more in this than may be generally supposed. Physiologists are well...

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