How to grow a forest from seed

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New Hampshire College Agricultural Experiment Station, New Hampshire College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 1902 - Gardening
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Page 98 - I and two men with me spent nearly two days cutting about fifty trees and picking the cones from them. We gathered two wagon loads, some fifty bushels, before the cones were opened very much ; after drying there were probably one hundred bushels of cones. FIG. 5. One year old and two year old White Pine seedlings taken from the woods. The second year poor seedlings have made very little growth the second year, due to insufficient light. The second year good seedlings were secured from a partially...
Page 105 - ... better than seedlings. Not only a better top but a more symmetrical root system is found on the transplant. HOW TO GROW A FOREST FROM SEED 105 The more a small tree is successfully transplanted the greater the tendency it has to form a ball of fibrous roots called the root ball about its base. (/) Distance apart for trees to stand. There is much discussion at present as to what is the proper distance to set young seedlings or transplants. Naturally, the greater the number the greater the expense....
Page 101 - Price 54.00 per thousand in large lots ; in smaller quantities 85.00 to $10.00 per thousand. handled is cleared, scrub, or waste lands. If the seed has been collected in quantities and at little expense, one can afford, perhaps, to sow it broadcast and run the risk of a portion of it germinating and growing. If the land cannot be cultivated, and all that one can do is to simply sow the seed, the quantity of seed should be the maximum amount. This is nature's method of growing pine trees, and we find...
Page 94 - FiG. 2. The young fine tree at the beginning. (1) The pine cone closed as it comes from the tree containing the seed. (2) The open dried cone from which the seed has been taken. (3) The pine seed after the wings are rubbed off as it is purchased on the market. (4) The seedlings as they appear during the first four years of their existence. HOW TO GROW A FOREST FROM SEED BY F. WM.
Page 95 - HOW TO GROW A FOREST FROM SEED BY F. WM. RANE, Professor of Horticulture and Forestry, New Hampshire College. The question of how to utilize the unproductive and waste lands throughout New England should be solved in one of two ways. They should receive such care and attention that they could be classified as crop or farm lands adapted to practical and successful agriculture, or they should be set aside for wood or forest growth. The forest should be considered as an actual field crop, and a knowledge...
Page 103 - ... planted. If the conditions have been favorable and the seed good, however, they will have swollen or cracked sufficiently so that the young embryo will be able to make its appearance FIG 8. A sample of ten to twelve inch White Pine transplants, from a Western nursery. Price $25.00 a thousand, or $3.00 a hundred.
Page 106 - Making improvement cuttings. By harvesting a part of the crop every six to ten years those trees that remain grow rapidly in value. Be careful to do the work right. to-day had animals been kept out of them. Lands that are adapted for agriculture should be retained and used for that purpose, but when they cease to be of profit they should be turned over to forests, and they will increase in value in proportion to the care given them.
Page 101 - ... sand, if they are assisted in getting a foothold, while other trees, like the oak and walnut, demand a more substantial subsistence. Most soils, therefore, may be adapted to forest growths by a 101 proper study of the conditions and adaptations, poorer soils needing more attention than good ones. (6) Planting. Just how to handle the seed in planting will depend very much upon whether one has collected his own seed at a minimum cost or purchased it; also, whether the land to be FIG. 7. A sample...
Page 99 - ... spell of weather and but little rain. If the cones get wet they close up. Every day I stirred them up once or several times with a rake. When well opened I thrashed them and carefully raked off the cones and FIG. 6. A sample of four to six inch White Pine seedlings from a Western nursery. Price 3.00 per thousand when purchased in quantities ; $4.00 for single thousands. gathered up the seed. I obtained about five bushels of seed. I did not winnow it or take pains to get it very clear from needles,...
Page 98 - EXPERIMENTS their glory, and it is these seedlings we have designs upon for future pine forests. When these seedlings are two years of age the stronger and better ones are ready to transplant into permanent places. They may be allowed to reFIG. 4. One year old and two year old white pine seedlings taken from the woods. The second' year poor seedlings have made very little growth the second year, due to Insufficient light. The second year good seedlings were .secured from a partially open space in...

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