How to Sing

Front Cover
Macmillan, 1914 - Singing - 323 pages
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Contents

I
9
II
23
III
33
IV
40
V
50
VI
69
VII
88
VIII
95
XXI
197
XXII
200
XXIII
204
XXIV
216
XXV
218
XXVI
223
XXVII
230
XXVIII
233

IX
110
X
113
XI
115
XII
129
XIII
134
XIV
151
XV
163
XVI
167
XVII
171
XVIII
178
XIX
184
XX
189
XXIX
236
XXX
242
XXXI
251
XXXII
258
XXXIII
263
XXXIV
270
XXXV
300
XXXVI
302
XXXVII
307
XXXVIII
320
Copyright

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Page 15 - All was absolutely good, correct and flawless, the voice like a bell that you seemed to hear long after the singing had ceased.
Page 45 - Singers should seek to acquire -accurate knowledge of their own organs, as well as of their functions, that they may not let themselves be burnt, cut and cauterized by unscrupulous physicians. Leave the larynx and all connected with it alone. I give warning of unprincipled physicians who daub around in the larynx, burn it, cut it, and make everything worse instead of better. I cannot comprehend why singers do not unite to brand such people publicly and put an end to their doings once for all...
Page 142 - register' is kept in use, the registers will not disappear; and yet the register question must be swept away, to give place to another class of ideas, sounder views on the part of teachers, and a truer conception on the part of singers and pupils.
Page 327 - CLARA SCHUMANN. An Artist's Life. Based on Material found in Diaries and Letters. By BERTHOLD LITZMANN. Translated and Abridged from the Fourth Edition by GRACE E. HADOW. With a Preface by Dr.
Page 11 - Study that must be kept up for at least six years, without counting the preliminary work,
Page 328 - Hubert Parry's Style in Musical Art and Musical Composition, a Short Treatise for Students by Sir Charles Villiers Stanford. An important Catalogue of Printed Music published between 1487 and 1800 now in the British Museum is edited by Mr. W. Barclay Squire, Assistant in the Department of Printed Books (Brit. Mus.). One of the marked features of the day is undoubtedly the dissemination of Knowledge to the people at nominal...
Page 182 - ... direct breath pressure. One must learn to tense them by means of various muscular functions. " The tremolo can also be produced by the false placement of the larynx which is not always fixed close enough under the nose and chin, and being disunited with e and u by means of y it wabbles around alone. " Even the vibrato to which full voices are prone, should be nipped in the bud, for gradually the tremolo and later something even worse, is developed from it. Life can be infused into the tone by...
Page 15 - Her vocal organs stood in the most favorable relations to each other. Her talent, and her remarkably trained ear, maintained control over the beauty of her singing and of her voice. The fortunate circumstances of her life preserved her from all injury. The purity and flawlessness of her tone, the beautiful equalization of her whole voice, constituted the magic by which she held her listeners entranced.
Page 134 - Do registers exist by nature ? No. It may be said that they are created through long years of speaking in the vocal range that is easiest to the person, or in one adopted by imitation, which then becomes a fixed habit.
Page 141 - It will be much more correct," she suggests, "to call every tone of every voice by the name of a new additional register, for in the end every tone will and must be taken in a different position of the organs, although the difference may be imperceptible, if it is to have its proper place in the whole.

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