How to write: advice and reflections

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William Morrow and Company, 1995 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 229 pages
2 Reviews
How To Write will appeal to those who desire a career in writing, who want to express themselves better through language, or who are interested in the beauty and the magic of language. Comfortably and familiarly, Rhodes addresses the concerns of all writers: finding your voice, researching your subject, the business and process of writing - including getting your manuscript published once you have finished it - and keeping grounded in your work. Rich with personal vignettes about the author's sources of inspiration, How To Write is also a memoir of one of the most original writers of our day. Readers will be drawn to Rhodes's frank and honest remembrances of his difficult childhood and his testimony to how writing acted as a form of therapy. How To Write sparks new excitement about writing and language and provides a deeper look at a master of both.

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User Review  - nmele - LibraryThing

Rhodes delivers exactly what he promises: advice and reflections. He illustrates both with examples from his own work, sometimes detailed examples. If you like Rhodes' work, this is a great book to read. If you are a writer or aspiring writer, it is also a great book to read. Read full review

HOW TO WRITE: Advice and Reflections

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Scratch a Pulitzer Prize winner, find a former Hallmark Card employee with a troubled past and a passion to write. Early on in this spirited handbook for beginners, Rhodes (The Making of the Atomic ... Read full review

Contents

Words Like a Life Rope I
15
Voices
35
Research
57
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Richard Lee Rhodes is a writer. He was born in Kansas City, Kansas on July 4, 1937. Rhodes received a B.A. from Yale University in 1959. Rhodes has received grants from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the Sloan Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts. He began writing articles and essays that appeared in Harper's, Reader's Digest, Esquire, The New Yorker, and Rolling Stone. Rhodes first book, The Island Ground, was published in 1970. He has written more than two dozen books. Rhodes' book, The Making of the Atomic Bomb won the 1988 Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction, the National Book Award for Nonfiction, and the National Book Critics Circle Award in General Nonfiction. Another book, Dark Sun: The Making of the Hydrogen Bomb, was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in History in 1996.

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