Howl: A Graphic Novel

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Aug 31, 2010 - Comics & Graphic Novels - 224 pages
7 Reviews

Now a Major Motion Picture!

First published in 1956, Allen Ginsberg's Howl is a prophetic masterpiece—an epic raging against dehumanizing society that overcame censorship trials and obscenity charges to become one of the most widely read poems of the century.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mamzel - LibraryThing

This is the first time I actually read this poem, representative of the beat poets. I can't boast that I understand all of it but I certainly can see the brilliance of the author. The art of this book is fabulous but is less dark and jagged than the words. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JWarren42 - LibraryThing

Brilliance. The only thing that I would have liked more would have been 100% hand-drawn art rather than computer assisted work. Still breathtaking, though. HIGHLY recommended. Read full review

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About the author (2010)

Allen Ginsberg was born in Newark, New Jersey, in 1926, a son of Naomi and lyric poet Louis Ginsberg. As a student at Columbia College in the 1940s, he began a close friendship with William Burroughs, Neal Cassady, and Jack Kerouac, and he later became associated with the Beat movement and the San Francisco Renaissance in the 1950s. After jobs as a laborer, sailor, and market researcher, Ginsberg published his first volume of poetry, Howl and Other Poems, in 1956. "Howl" defeated censorship trials to become one of the most widely read poems of the century, translated into more than twenty-two languages, from Macedonian to Chinese, a model for younger generations of poets from West to East.

Ginsberg was a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, was awarded the medal of Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French minister of culture, was a winner of the National Book Award (for The Fall of America), and was a cofounder of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at the Naropa Institute, the first accredited Buddhist college in the Western world. He died in New York City in 1997.

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