Human-Centered Software Engineering: Software Engineering Models, Patterns and Architectures for HCI

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Ahmed Seffah, Jean Vanderdonckt, Michel C. Desmarais
Springer Science & Business Media, Jun 19, 2009 - Computers - 398 pages
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Activity theory is a way of describing and characterizing the structure of human - tivity of all kinds. First introduced by Russian psychologists Rubinshtein, Leontiev, and Vigotsky in the early part of the last century, activity theory has more recently gained increasing attention among interaction designers and others in the hum- computer interaction and usability communities (see, for example, Gay and H- brooke, 2004). Interest was given a signi?cant boost when Donald Norman suggested activity-theory and activity-centered design as antidotes to some of the putative ills of “human-centered design” (Norman, 2005). Norman, who has been credited with coining the phrase “user-centered design,” suggested that too much attention focused on human users may be harmful, that to design better tools designers need to focus not so much on users as on the activities in which users are engaged and the tasks they seek to perform within those activities. Although many researchers and practitioners claim to have used or been in?uenced by activity theory in their work (see, for example, Nardi, 1996), it is often dif?cult to trace precisely where or how the results have actually been shaped by activity theory. Inmanycases, evendetailedcasestudiesreportresultsthatseemonlydistantlyrelated, if at all, to the use of activity theory. Contributing to the lack of precise and traceable impact is that activity theory, - spite its name, is not truly a formal and proper theory.
 

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Contents

fied bank system
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puter from UIML document
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Legacy Systems Interaction Reengineering
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Compatibility criterion thanks to a clickable map of the house
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About the author (2009)

Ahmed Seffah is a professor in the department of Computer Science at Concordia University. He is director of the Human-Centered Software Engineering Group and the co-founder of the Concordia Software Usability and Empirical Studies Lab. He holds a PhD in software engineering from the Ecole Centrale de Lyon (France). His research interest are at the crossroads between software engineering and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), including usability measurement, user interface design, empirical studies on developer experiences with CASE tools, human-centered software engineering, and patterns as a vehicle for integrating HCI knowledge in software engineering practices. Dr. Seffah is the vice-chair of the IFIP working group on user-centered design methodologies. During the last 10 years, he has been involved in different projects in North America and Europe.

Homa Javahery is a researcher and project manager with the Human-Centered Software Engineering Group, including the Usability and Empirical Studies Lab, in the department of Computer Science at Concordia University. She holds a Master's degree in Computer Science from Concordia University, and a Bachelor of Science degree from McGill University. She is combining different design approaches from human sconces and engineering disciplines to develop a pattern-oriented framework for designing a large variety of interfaces. She has been involved in different collaborative projects at the INRIA Research Institute in Nancy, France and the Daimler-Chrysler Research Institute in Ulm, Germany.

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