Human Cognition and Social Agent Technology

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Kerstin Dautenhahn
John Benjamins Publishing, 2000 - Philosophy - 447 pages
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Human Cognition and Social Agent Technology is written for readers who are curious about what human (social) cognition is, and whether and how advanced software programs or robots can become social agents. Topics addressed in 16 peer-reviewed chapters by researchers at the forefront of agent research include: Narrative intelligence and implementations of story-telling systems, socially situated avatars and 'conscious' software agents, cognitive architectures for socially intelligent agents, agents with emotions, design issues for interactive systems, artificial life agents, contributions to agent design from artistic practice, and a Cognitive Technology view on living with socially intelligent agents. The book addresses both software and robotic agents. On the one hand justice is done to the scientific and technical aspects, and on the other hand the reader will learn about pioneering technological developments which are necessary for a public discourse and critical evaluation on where social agent technology is leading us and how such a development can be shaped in order to meet the social, cultural and cognitive needs of humans.
The book is suitable for students, researchers, and everyone interested in this emerging and quickly growing field, it does not require any specialist background knowledge.
(Series B)
 

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Contents

CHAPTER 1
1
of Memory Story and Self
27
Let me tell you a story about myself
61
CHAPTER 4
85
CHAPTERS
113
CHAPTER 6
137
CHAPTER 7
163
CHAPTER 8
197
CHAPTER 10
263
CHAPTER 11
301
CHAPTER 12
323
CHAPTER 13
349
CHAPTER 14
377
CHAPTER 15
395
CHAPTER 16
415
Subject Index
427

CHAPTER 9
225

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About the author (2000)

Kerstin Dautenhahn is Research Professor of Artificial Intelligence in the School of Computer Science at the University of Hertfordshire, where she is a coordinator of the Adaptive Systems Research Group. Her research interests include social learning, human-robot interaction, social robotics, narrative and robotic assisted therapy for children with autism. She is the Editor-in-Chief of Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems and the general chair of the IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (RO-MAN 2006).

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