Human Rights Activism and the End of the Cold War: A Transnational History of the Helsinki Network

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 20, 2011 - Political Science
Two of the most pressing questions facing international historians today are how and why the Cold War ended. Human Rights Activism and the End of the Cold War explores how, in the aftermath of the signing of the Helsinki Final Act in 1975, a transnational network of activists committed to human rights in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe made the topic a central element in East-West diplomacy. As a result, human rights eventually became an important element of Cold War diplomacy and a central component of détente. Sarah B. Snyder demonstrates how this network influenced both Western and Eastern governments to pursue policies that fostered the rise of organized dissent in Eastern Europe, freedom of movement for East Germans and improved human rights practices in the Soviet Union - all factors in the end of the Cold War.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Bridging the EastWest Divide
15
2 A Sort of Lifeline
38
3 Even in a Yakutian Village
53
4 Followup at Belgrade
81
5 Helsinki Watch the IHF and the Transnational Campaign for Human Rights in Eastern Europe
115
6 Human Rights in EastWest Diplomacy
135
7 A Debate in the Fox Den About Raising Chickens
174
8 Perhaps Without You Our Revolution Would Not Be
217
Conclusion
244
Bibliography
251
Index
287
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Sarah B. Snyder is a Lecturer in International History at University College London. She has published a number of scholarly articles in journals such as Cold War History, Diplomacy and Statecraft, the Journal of Transatlantic Studies and the Journal of American Studies, as well as multiple book chapters. Dr Snyder specializes in transnational, international and diplomatic history.

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