Human and Divine: 2000 Years of Indian Sculpture

Front Cover
University of California Press, 2000 - Art - 84 pages
0 Reviews
This beautifully illustrated book provides a unique consideration of the magnificent tradition of Indian sculpture and offers valuable insight into the inspiration behind it. Much of Indian sculpture is sacred in purpose, embodying religious beliefs and philosophical ideals. It is at the same time deeply sensual, celebrating the human body in all its astonishing variety, and has been used to portray the gods and goddesses of Hinduism, as well as the saviors and saints of Buddhism and Jainism. The fusion of earthly and transcendent realms is conveyed by transformations, poses, and gestures whose symbolism is understood by every adherent of these great religions.
Produced to accompany the traveling exhibition of the same name, Human and Divine highlights the achievements of a dynamic artistic tradition and explains what Indian sculpture means and why it looks as it does. The sculptures--made from stone, bronze, terracotta, marble, ivory, and wood--are drawn from British public and private collections and date from ancient times to the early twentieth century.
Balraj Khanna outlines the early history of Indian sculpture and places it in its cultural and religious context. George Michell describes the various forms and styles that have developed in the different regions of India and explains the significance of specific works. This beautifully illustrated book provides a unique consideration of the magnificent tradition of Indian sculpture and offers valuable insight into the inspiration behind it. Much of Indian sculpture is sacred in purpose, embodying religious beliefs and philosophical ideals. It is at the same time deeply sensual, celebrating the human body in all its astonishing variety, and has been used to portray the gods and goddesses of Hinduism, as well as the saviors and saints of Buddhism and Jainism. The fusion of earthly and transcendent realms is conveyed by transformations, poses, and gestures whose symbolism is understood by every adherent of these great religions.
Produced to accompany the traveling exhibition of the same name, Human and Divine highlights the achievements of a dynamic artistic tradition and explains what Indian sculpture means and why it looks as it does. The sculptures--made from stone, bronze, terracotta, marble, ivory, and wood--are drawn from British public and private collections and date from ancient times to the early twentieth century.
Balraj Khanna outlines the early history of Indian sculpture and places it in its cultural and religious context. George Michell describes the various forms and styles that have developed in the different regions of India and explains the significance of specific works.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Preface
5
2000 Years o Indian Sculpture Balraj Khan n a
57
Glossary
76
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2000)

Artist and writer Balraj Khanna and writer and archaeologist George Michell selected works that appear in the exhibition Human and Divine. Khanna also curated Kalighat: Indian Popular Painting, 1800-1930 and Krishna: The Divine Lover. Michell was involved in the selection of sculptures for the Hayward Gallery's exhibition In the Image of Man—The Indian Perception of the Universe through 2000 Years of Painting and Sculpture; he was also the curator of Living Wood: Sculptural Traditions of Southern India.

Bibliographic information