The Human Nature and Conduct: An Introduction to Social Psychology

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Henry Holt and Company, 1922 - Habit - 336 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
14
III
24
IV
43
V
58
VI
75
VII
84
VIII
89
XV
172
XVI
181
XVII
189
XVIII
199
XIX
210
XX
223
XXI
238
XXII
248

IX
95
X
106
XI
125
XII
131
XIII
149
XIV
169
XXIII
265
XXIV
278
XXV
295
XXVI
303
XXVII
314
Copyright

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Page 153 - The treatment of sex by psycho-analysts is most instructive, for it flagrantly exhibits both the consequences of artificial simplification and the transformation of social results into psychic causes. Writers, usually male, hold forth on the psychology of woman, as if they were dealing with a Platonic universal entity, although they habitually treat men as individuals, varying with structure and environment.
Page 166 - To view institutions as enemies of freedom, and all conventions as slaveries, is to deny the only means by which positive freedom in action can be secured.
Page 125 - Habits once formed perpetuate themselves, by acting unremittingly upon the native stock of activities. They stimulate, inhibit, intensify, weaken, select, concentrate and organize the latter into their own likeness. They create out of the formless void of impulses a world made in their own image. Man is a creature of habit, not of reason nor yet of instinct.
Page 229 - It is willful folly to fasten upon some single end or consequence which is liked, and permit the view of that to blot from perception all other undesired and undesirable consequences.
Page 232 - Endless ends" is a way of saying that there are no ends — that is no fixed self-enclosed finalities. While however we cannot actually prevent change from occurring we can and do regard it as evil. We strive to retain action in ditches already dug. We regard novelties as dangerous, experiments as illicit and deviations as forbidden. Fixed and separate ends reflect a projection of our own fixed and non-interacting compartmental habits. We see only consequences which correspond to our habitual courses....
Page 96 - For the most part, this continuous alteration has been unconscious and unintended. Immature, undeveloped activity has succeeded in modifying adult organized activity accidentally and surreptitiously. But with the dawn of the idea of progressive betterment and an interest in new uses of impulses, there has grown up some consciousness of the extent to which a future new society of changed purposes and desires may be created by a deliberate humane treatment of the impulses of youth.
Page 35 - His long standing habit of irregularity was still to be reckoned with as well as his acute sense of inferiority and his emotional interest in the old job. Where was the visitor to begin in her effort to change his habits? Dewey tells us that 'Until one takes intermediate acts seriously enough to treat them as ends, one wastes one's time in any effort to change habit. Of the intermediate acts, the most important is the next one.
Page 71 - The artist is a masterful technician. The technique or mechanism is fused with thought and feeling. The "mechanical" performer permits the mechanism to dictate the performance. It is absurd to say that the latter exhibits habit and the former not. We are confronted with two kinds of habit, intelligent and routine.
Page 263 - When a sense of the infinite reach of an act physically occurring in a small point of space and occupying a petty instant of time, comes home to us, the meaning of a present act is seen to be vast, immeasurable, unthinkable. This ideal is not a goal to be attained. It is a significance to be felt, appreciated.
Page 40 - But we need a word to express that kind of human activity which is influenced by prior activity and in that sense acquired ; which contains within itself a cer,tain ordering or...

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