Human Rights and Social Work: Towards Rights-Based Practice

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 2, 2001 - Law - 230 pages
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This book argues that incorporating the idea of three 'generations' of human rights allows us to move beyond the limitations of conventional legal frameworks. It examines current human rights issues and shows how a broader understanding of human rights can be used to ground a form of practice that is central to social work, community development and broader human services. The argument extends the idea of human rights beyond the realm of theoretical analysis, and into the arena of professional practice and social action, using a critical theory perspective. This is set within the context of current debates about globalisation and the need to incorporate an internationalist viewpoint into all social work practice. This insightful new international study adds a vital new perspective to the challenge of promoting international human rights.
 

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Contents

Introduction
viii
Human Rights in a Globalised World
1
The Three Generations of Human Rights
24
Public and Private Human Rights
43
Culture and Human Rights
58
Human Rights and Human Needs
76
Human Rights and Obligations
89
Ethics and Human Rights
103
Constructing Human Rights for Social Work Practice
132
Achieving Human Rights through Social Work Practice
140
Respecting Human Rights in Social Work Practice
167
Conclusion Prospects for Human Rights Practice
200
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights
204
Other Human Rights Declarations Treaties and Conventions
210
References
214
Index
225

Participation in the Human Rights Discourse
117

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