Hungary and NATO: Problems in Civil-Military Relations

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Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Sep 16, 2003 - Technology & Engineering - 144 pages
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Since the revolutions of 1989-1990, most Central and Eastern European states have been striving to adhere to Euro-Atlantic institutions; and when NATO developed its own 'criteria' for membership, democratic control of the military was considered an essential precondition. Based on firsthand participatory and observational insight, Hungary and NATO: Problems in Civil-Military Relations closely follows Hungary's early work to secure an invitation to join the Alliance in July 1997, preparations for accession in March 1999, and its first four years as a NATO ally. While charting the successes, shortcomings, and continuing challenges faced in its quest to become a full NATO member, Jeffrey Simon presents a comprehensive and original study of civil-military relations in Hungary and simultaneously provides a conceptual framework of civil-military relations that draws upon the lessons of post-communist transition in the entire Central and East European region.
 

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Contents

1989 Revolution and Democratic Control of the Military
1
Miklos Nemeths Legacy and the Need for Defense Reform
7
1990 Parliamentary Elections The Rise of Jozsef Antall
13
1994 Parliamentary Elections PostCommunist Return of Gyula Horn
23
1998 Parliamentary Elections CenterRight Government Returns
55
2002 Parliamentary Elections The Hungarian Socialists Return
89
CivilMilitary Relations Prospects
93
Notes
101
Index
121
About the Author
131
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About the author (2003)

Jeffrey Simon is senior fellow at the Institute for National Strategic Studies, National Defense University.

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