Hungry Hollow: The Story of a Natural Place

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Springer Science & Business Media, Aug 21, 1998 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 233 pages
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Hungry Hollow is simply an ordinary creek winding through about a mile of ordinary forest and meadow somewhere east of the Rocky Mountains. But like all such places, it is also a vast and intricate web of life with extensions that reach around the planet, back into prehistoric time, and within to a teeming, bizarre microscopic world. In dozens of short, wonderfully imaginative chapters, A.K. Dewdney introduces us to the denizens of this world. We encounter a hackberry tree whose branches perfectly reproduce the taxonomic Tree of Life, learn how it would look and feel to shrink by stages to the size of an amoeba while swimming in a river, watch a toad win the lottery, and see the world of Hungry Hollow from the viewpoint of bears, earthworms, and even stones. This is an excursion into natural history like no other.
 

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Contents

Procyon lotor
2
The Tippecanoe Sea
10
Dianne sapiens
17
The Hackberry
23
The Ants Journey
30
Congress of Birds
40
Microperson
49
Water
61
In the forest
126
The Art of Decay
134
Bear
143
Stories in Stone
153
Hungry Creek
160
Requiem for a Toad
169
Survival of the Lucky
176
The Book of Kaolinite
183

Cymbella and the Hypotrich
68
On the Back or a Turtle
77
The Meadow
84
The Labyrinths
91
Prayer of the Mantis
98
The Hydraulic Plant
104
The Storm
110
Abundance
117
Didelphis virginianus
191
Animal Minds
197
Permanent Clearcut
203
Ursa Major
210
NOTES
219
BIBLIOGRAPHY
230
Copyright

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Page 230 - Symbiosis: An Introduction to Biological Associations. Hanover, NH, University Press of New England.

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About the author (1998)

Recreations, his column which appeared in Scientific American for more than eight years. He has been an Associate Professor of Computer Science at the University of Western Ontario in Canada since 1968, and is president of Turing Omnibus, Inc. Among his many books on computer science, science and mathematics are Two Hundred Percent of Nothing (1993), an effort to expose abuses of math and statistics in everyday life and its companion work, Yes, We Have No Neutrons (1997). Dewdney is also interested in growing and distributing rare native trees, as manifested in his book, Hungry Hollow: The Story of a Natural Place (1998). Hungry Hollow examines the elements of a natural habitat in both time and space.

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