Hungry for Ecstasy: Trauma, the Brain, and the Influence of the Sixties

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Jason Aronson, Incorporated, Nov 16, 2012 - Psychology - 444 pages
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Hungry for Ecstasy: Trauma, The Brain, and the Influence of the Sixties by Sharon Klayman Farber explores the hunger for ecstatic experience that can lead people down the road to self-destruction. In an attempt to help mental health professionals and concerned individuals understand and identify the phenomenon and ultimately intervene with patients, friends, and loved ones, Farber speaks both personally and professionally to the reader. She discusses the different paths taken on the road to ecstatic states. There are religious ecstasies, ecstasies of pain and near-death experiences, cult-induced ecstasies, creative ecstasies, and ecstasies from hell. Hungry for Ecstasy explores not only the neuroscientific processes involved but also the influence of the sixties in driving people to seek these states. Finally, Farber draws from her own personal and professional experience to advise others how to intervene on behalf of the person whose behavior puts his or her life at risk.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Falling the Dying and Being Born Again
15
2 Altered States of Consciousness
37
3 The Brain and Altered States of Consciousness
47
Something Is Happening Here
97
5 Marketing and Producing Ecstasy
117
6 CultInduced Ecstasy and Psychosis
127
7 Ecstasies of Pain and NearDeath Experiences
163
9 Killing Cannibalism and Other Ecstasies from Hell
261
10 Creative Ecstasies
277
11 Intervening with Those on the Road to Ecstasy
313
12 Intersubjectivity and the Power of the Therapists Affective Experience
335
References
369
Index
395
About the Author
413
Copyright

8 Religious Ecstasies
211

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About the author (2012)

Sharon Klayman Farber, PhD, is a board certified diplomate in clinical social work. She is the author of When the Body is the Target: Self-Harm, Pain, and Traumatic Attachments.

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