Hunters and Fishers: Or, Sketches of Primitive Races in the Lands Beyond the Sea

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Chapman and Hall, 1846 - Ethnology - 146 pages
 

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Page 133 - Where slaves once more their native land behold, No fiends torment, no Christians thirst for gold. To be, contents his natural desire ; He asks no angel's wing, no seraph's fire ; But thinks, admitted to that equal sky, His faithful dog shall bear him company.
Page 120 - tented") by urchins, whose whole dress and equipment was the slight bow and arrow, with which they exercised their infant archery upon the heads of the taller flowers, or upon any luckless blackbird perched near them. Here and there might be seen some gay young warrior ambling along the heights, his painted form partially exposed to view as his bright scarlet blanket waved in the breeze ; while his small fretful horse was scarcely to be recognized under the variety of trappings with which the vanity...
Page 120 - ... and a more interesting or picturesque scene I never beheld. Upon an extensive prairie gently sloping down to a creek, the winding course of which was marked by a broken line of wood here and there interspersed with a fine clump of trees, were about five thousand savages, inclusive of women and children ; some were sitting under their buffalo-skin lodges lazily smoking their pipes ; while the women were stooping over their fires busily employed in preparing meat and maize for these indolent lords...
Page 89 - Surely the mountains bring him forth food, where all the beasts of the field play. He lieth under the shady trees, in the covert of the reed, and fens. The shady trees cover him with their shadow; the willows of the brook compass him about. Behold he drinketh up a river, and hasteth not: he trusteth that he can draw up Jordan into his mouth. He taketh it with his eyes: his nose pierceth through snares.
Page 84 - Their number did not exceed twenty, and their abode was merely a cavern in the side of the mountain, sheltered by huge impending crags. They had no earthly possessions whatever, excepting the miserable bit of dirty skin which hung around them ; their bows and arrows, a few hassagays, a knife, and two or three ostrich eggshells. They had not even a hut, or a few mats, like most of their...
Page 84 - ... persons, meagre and filthy, too plainly bespoke that hunger had often been their lot. Except when any game was caught in their pitfalls, which, they complained, seldom happened, the only procurable support of life was the wild roots which they daily dug up in the plains, and these, not found but by long and wearisome search ; the eggs of ants, the bodies of snakes or lizards, a tortoise, or an ostrich egg, met with accidentally, formed the only variety in their wretched food. Their life, and...
Page 136 - The forests cast their fruits, in husk or rind, Yielding sweet kernels or delicious pulp, Smooth oil, cool milk, and unfermented wine, In rich and exquisite variety. On these the indolent inhabitants Fed without care or forethought...
Page 7 - ... on the trunk with outspread wings awaiting the approach of evening. Myriads of the most brilliant beetles buzz in the air, and sparkle like jewels on the fresh green of the leaves, or on the odorous flowers. Meantime agile lizards, remarkable for their form, size, and brilliant colours...
Page 81 - Table, Plattenburg, Algoa bays. Cape Aguillas is the most southern point of the old world. In the interior, almost every variety of soil and surface is found. Several ranges of mountains, running nearly parallel to the southern coast, divide the country into successive terraces, between which lie belts of fertile land, or vast barren plains. One of these, called the Great Karroo, is 300 miles long and 100 broad, presenting a scene of complete desolation. In fact, according to Barrow, nearly seven...
Page 84 - They had not even a hut, or a few mats, like most of their countrymen. Neither beads, nor any thing intended as ornament, were to be seen upon them : their persons, meagre and filthy, too plainly bespoke that hunger had often been their lot. Except when any game was caught in their pitfalls, which, they complained, seldom happened, the only procurable support of life, was the wild roots which they daily dug up in the plains ; and these, not found but by long and wearisome search : the eggs of ants,...

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